Modern Thermodynamics with Statistical Mechanics

Available

Product Details

Price
$99.99
Publisher
Springer
Publish Date
Pages
402
Dimensions
6.4 X 1.0 X 9.1 inches | 1.8 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9783540854173

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Reviews

From the reviews:

"Helrich (physics, Goshen College) is to be commended for managing to cover in this modest volume a wide spectrum of topics ... . his book can be viewed as a self-teaching guide to thermodynamics. The well-thought-out problems at the end of each chapter require in-depth thinking that strengthens students' learning. This book is ideal for physicists and engineering students ... . It also is suitable for graduate students pursuing research in thermodynamics ... . Summing Up: Highly recommended. Libraries serving upper-division undergraduates through professionals/practitioners." (R. N. Laoulache, Choice, Vol. 46 (11), July, 2009)

"Thermodynamics plays a central role in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. ... The author of the present work had the aim to present modern thermodynamics in an as simple and as unified as possible form. He elected to present statistical mechanics as an integral part of the text. ... Every chapter ends with exercises ... . some of the exercises are intended as vehicles for investigations. ... The work is intended to be used as an introduction to modern thermodynamics and statistical mechanics." (Claudia-Veronika Meister, Zentralblatt MATH, Vol. 1159, 2009)

"Carl Helrich has written a lucid account of the field. His explanations are extremely clear and the book is particularly well structured, beginning as it does with the basic principles and developing from there to a consideration of thermodynamic potentials in terms of surfaces. ... The explanations are clear and the mathematics is well presented. ... an excellent work on which to base a university thermodynamics course. ... the level is appropriate for a moderately mathematically-able undergraduate ... ." (Stephen H. Ashworth, Contemporary Physics, Vol. 52 (1), 2011)