Moby Dick

Herman Melville (Author)
Available

Description

A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick

Melville's classic tale of obsession and the sea, one of the most important and enduring masterworks of nineteenth-century literature, Moby Dick is a riveting drama, exploring rage, hope, destiny, and the deepest questions of moral truth.

"Call me Ishmael."

Thus begins one of the most famous journeys in literature--the voyage of the whaling ship Pequod and its embattled, monomaniacal Captain Ahab. Ishmael quickly learns that the Pequod's captain sails for revenge against the elusive Moby Dick, a sperm whale with a snow-white hump and mottled skin that destroyed Ahab's former vessel and left him crippled. As the Pequod sails deeper through the nights and into the sea, the divisions between man and nature begin to blur--so do the lines between good and evil, as the fates of the ship's crewmen become increasingly unclear. . . .

Product Details

Price
$15.99
Publisher
Harper Perennial
Publish Date
June 07, 2011
Pages
589
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 1.7 inches | 1.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780062085641
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Herman Melville[a] (1819 - 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer and poet of the American Renaissance period. His best known works include Typee (1846), a romantic account of his experiences in Polynesian life and his whaling novel Moby-Dick (1851). His work was almost forgotten during his last thirty years. His writing draws on his experience at sea as a common sailor, exploration of literature and philosophy, and engagement in the contradictions of American society in a period of rapid change. Melville developed a complex, baroque style: the vocabulary is rich and original, a strong sense of rhythm infuses the elaborate sentences, the imagery is often mystical or ironic and the abundance of allusion extends to Scripture, myth, philosophy, literature and the visual arts.