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Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.67
Publisher
Dalkey Archive Press
Publish Date
Pages
338
Dimensions
5.96 X 8.96 X 0.98 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781564783431
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Michel Butor (1926) est l'auteur d'une oeuvre considerable de plus de six cents livres, parmi lesquels des romans, notamment"La Modification"(prix Renaudot, 1957), des recueil de poesies, dont le fameux "Travaux d'approche"(1972), de nombreux essais, comme"Improvisations sur Flaubert"(1989) et"Improvisations sur Rimbaud" (1989). Il est le dernier grand representant de l'ecole du Nouveau Roman.

Richard Howard was one of the most prolific and respected twentieth-century literary critics and translators. He won a Pulitzer Prize, a PEN Translation Prize, a National Book Award (for Les Fleurs Du Mal), a Literary Award from the Academy of Arts and Letters, a MacArthur Fellowship, the title of Chevalier from France's L'Ordre National du Merite, and the position of Poet Laureate of New York.

John D'Agata is the author of About a Mountain, Halls of Fame and editor of The Next American Essay and The Lost Origins of the Essay. He teaches creative writing at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, where he lives.

Reviews

"With a lexicographer's zest for words, Butor...captures the tone of American cliches, suggests an almost dizzying sense of space and variety, and brings into ironic juxtaposition elements of primitiveness and sophistication that are part of the American myth."
A gifted disciple of French anti-novelist Alain Robbe-Grillet, Butor is notable because he uses a different technique with every book and turns out intense and interesting fiction just the same.
With a lexicographer's zest for words, Butor . . . captures the tone of American cliches, suggests an almost dizzying sense of space and variety, and brings into ironic juxtaposition elements of primitiveness and sophistication that are part of the American myth.