Memory, Brain, and Belief (Revised)

Available

Product Details

Price
$45.00
Publisher
Harvard University Press
Publish Date
Pages
364
Dimensions
6.14 X 0.75 X 9.21 inches | 1.11 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780674007192

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About the Author

DANIEL L. SCHACTER is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and received numerous awards for his research, including the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Psychology from the American Psychological Association and the Fred Kavli Distinguished Career Contributions Award from the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. He is the author of many books on memory and neuropsychology, including The Seven Sins of Memory and Searching for Memory. Schacter lives in Newton, Massachusetts. ,
Elaine Scarry is the Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value at Harvard University. Her book The Body in Pain was a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Reviews

The process of recalling things, people and events--using our memory--is something we do every day but think little about. Schacter and Scarry, editors of this collection of conference papers, seek to zero in on this ubiquitous, if ill-defined, activity by examining it from a variety of perspectives...The book's multidisciplinary approach makes for innovative insight into the subject; the writing and research is clear and well presented, accessible to the uninformed reader but still academically rigorous.--David E. Valencia "Library Journal "
The eleven chapters, and a masterful summary by Damasio, present many facets of the problem, from the paranoid delusions of the schizophrenic to experimentally provoked errors in memory.--Robert W. Doty "The Quarterly Review of Biology "
The decidedly interdisciplinary anthology brings together researchers from neuroscience, cognitive psychology, literature and medicine to discuss the nature of memory and belief...Researchers present interesting results indicating that one's own memories of the past are strongly influenced by one's present beliefs, current experience and even nonconscious influences. The picture of memory presented throughout these essays is both fascinating and disquieting...It is uncomfortable to be told that we do not know our own minds and past experiences as well as we think we do, but it makes for captivating reading...An interesting and useful contribution to the growing body of research on memory, belief, and autobiography.-- (01/28/2002)