Masochism

Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch (Author) Gilles Deleuze (Author)
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Available

Product Details

Price
$22.95  $21.11
Publisher
Zone Books
Publish Date
August 05, 1991
Pages
296
Dimensions
5.9 X 8.9 X 1.0 inches | 1.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780942299557
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch was an Austrian writer of fiction and short stories, who inspired the clinical category of 'Masochism'. His complex sexual fantasies, involving the love of pain and submission, ignited a once secretive pursuit into that of a recognised fetish. His masterpiece inspired a famous song of the same name by The Velvet Underground, and continues to be referred to as a defining work within the realm of erotic literature.

Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) was Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris VIII, Vincennes/Saint Denis. He published 25 books, including five in collaboration with FΓ© lix Guattari.

Reviews

" This provocative work places von Sacher-Masoch's classic 1870 novel "Venus in Furs "next to Deleuze's essay arguing that popular assumptions beginning with Freud have effectively obscured the unique power of von Sacher-Masoch's eroticism as well as the true nature of what might be called a masochist 'order.'" -- Keith Thompson, Utne Reader
& quot; This provocative work places von Sacher-Masoch's classic 1870 novel Venus in Furs next to Deleuze's essay arguing that popular assumptions beginning with Freud have effectively obscured the unique power of von Sacher-Masoch's eroticism as well as the true nature of what might be called a masochist 'order.'& quot; -- Keith Thompson, Utne Reader
"This provocative work places von Sacher-Masoch's classic 1870 novel "Venus in Furs "next to Deleuze's essay arguing that popular assumptions beginning with Freud have effectively obscured the unique power of von Sacher-Masoch's eroticism as well as the true nature of what might be called a masochist 'order.'"--Keith Thompson, Utne Reader