Man in the Holocene

(Author) (Translator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$12.50  $11.50
Publisher
Dalkey Archive Press
Publish Date
Pages
112
Dimensions
5.2 X 7.8 X 0.5 inches | 0.31 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781564784667
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Max Frisch (1911-1991) was born in Zurich, Switzerland before the First World War and was a soldier in the Second. In the interwar years, he traveled throughout Eastern and Central Europe as a journalist. After serving as a gunner on the Austrian and Italian borders, he followed in his father's footsteps and became an architect. These experiences helped forge the moral consciousness and the concern for human freedom that mark his writing. The author of I'm Not Stiller, Homo Faber, and The Man in the Holocene, and the winner of the Jerusalem Prize, the Heinrich Heine Prize, and Neustadt International Prize for Literature among other honors, Frisch was one of Europe's most important postwar writers.
Geoffrey David Skelton (1916-1998) was a British author and translator.

Reviews

"Haunting, sad, yet lovely....An important, disturbing and powerful novel that deserves attention."
"Poetry of the mind rather than the senses--sparse and austere, with every detail chosen for its resonances.... A small book but a major achievement."
"Frisch is a great, and even an inspiring, writer, because he gives us the unique sense that the act of analysis is a passionate act, impelled by our fear of the world's dissolution and our knowledge of our own fragility."
Frisch is a great, and even an inspiring, writer, because he gives us the unique sense that the act of analysis is a passionate act, impelled by our fear of the world's dissolution and our knowledge of our own fragility.
Poetry of the mind rather than the senses sparse and austere, with every detail chosen for its resonances . . . A small book but a major achievement.
Haunting, sad, yet lovely . . . An important, disturbing and powerful novel that deserves attention.
Poetry of the mind rather than the senses--sparse and austere, with every detail chosen for its resonances . . . A small book but a major achievement.