Kawsay: La Llama de la Selva / Kawsay: The Flame of the Jungle

Maria Vazquez Valdez (Author) Margaret Randall (Translator)
Backorder

Product Details

Price
$18.00
Publisher
Operating System
Publish Date
November 01, 2018
Pages
116
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.4 X 0.4 inches | 0.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781946031358
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

María Vázquez Valdez was born in Zacatecas, Mexico. She is a poet, editor, translator and photographer. Her books include the poetry collections Caldero (1999), Estancias (2004), and KAWSAY: LA LLAMA DE LA SELVA (2017); the book of essays Estaciones del albatros (2008); the bilingual book of interviews Voces desdobladas / Unfolding Voices (2004); and five books for children and young readers. She has translated several books of poetry. María received a degree in journalism, a Masters in editing, and is currently finishing a Doctorate in critical theory. She was part of the editorial board of Alforja from its foundation, and is now a member of the Mexican Academy of the Language's editorial team, as well as of other academic and cultural projects. She has been the director of publications at the Union of Latin American Universities (UDUAL), editor in chief of the literary magazine Arcilla Roja, editor of Greenpeace's GPMX magazine, and editor at Editorial Santillana. She has received grants and support from Mexican government institutions. The poems in KAWSAY: LA LLAMA DE LA SELVA have their roots in an experience with the Shipibo Indians of Peru's Amazon jungle.
Margaret Randall is a feminist poet, essayist, oral historian, translator, teacher, and photographer with a long history of social activism in Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, and the United States. She is the author, translator, and editor of nearly two hundred books and cofounder of El Corno Emplumado/The Plumed Horn, a bilingual journal that published more than seven hundred writers from thirty-five countries. She fought deportation by the U.S. government, which claimed her writing subversive, and won her case. She has been recently awarded the Poet of Two Hemispheres Prize, the Haydée Santamaría medal, an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of New Mexico, the Democratic Project Paulo Freire Award, and the George Garrett Award. She lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with her wife, the artist Barbara Byers.