Jewish Veganism and Vegetarianism: Studies and New Directions

Available

Product Details

Price
$33.95
Publisher
State University of New York Press
Publish Date
January 02, 2020
Pages
374
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 1.0 inches | 1.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781438473604

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About the Author

Jacob Ari Labendz is Director of the Center for Judaic and Holocaust Studies and Clayman Assistant Professor of Judaic and Holocaust Studies at Youngstown State University. He is the editor of Jewish Property After 1945: Cultures and Economies of Ownership, Loss, Recovery, and Transfer. Shmuly Yanklowitz is President and Dean at Valley Beit Midrash, Founder and President of Uri L'Tzedek, Founder and CEO of the Shamayim V'Aretz Institute, and Founder and President of YATOM: The Jewish Foster and Adoption Network. He is the author of many books, including Pirkei Avot: A Social Justice Commentary, Postmodern Jewish Ethics: Emerging Social Justice Paradigms, and The Jewish Vegan.

Reviews

"Whether looking at the pages of the Talmud, vegetarian poems written in Yiddish, lyrics written by Jewish punk rockers, or into a pot of vegan matzo ball soup, this book explores the many ways in which Jews have questioned the ethics of eating animals. Labendz and Yanklowitz achieve their stated goal of exploring 'what distinguishes Jewish veganism and vegetarianism as Jewish.' You do not have to be a vegetarian or a vegan (or Jewish!) in order to learn from, and indeed grapple with, the many questions, dilemmas, and readings that the contributors raise." -- Jordan D. Rosenblum, author of The Jewish Dietary Laws in the Ancient World

"Jewish Veganism and Vegetarianism offers theological, pragmatic, ethical, environmental, and other ways to view non-meat eating as a viable, healthy, and holy Judaic strategy to consume the world. Anyone who eats or thinks about eating should take this volume seriously." -- Rabbi Jonathan K. Crane, author of Eating Ethically: Religion and Science for a Better Diet

"From the Talmud's ambivalence about human and animal suffering to the challenges of making a vegan matzo ball, Jewish Veganism and Vegetarianism offers surprising views of the many ways Jewish practice, Jewish culture, and individual Jews acted and reacted in their encounters with a vegetable diet. This important and overdue book does much to introduce a long-neglected chapter of Jewish culinary practice and to inspire and instruct future research." -- Eve Jochnowitz, cotranslator of Fania Lewando's The Vilna Vegetarian Cookbook: Garden-Fresh Recipes Rediscovered and Adapted for Today's Kitchen