Jewish Comedy: A Serious History

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Product Details

Price
$28.95
Publisher
W. W. Norton & Company
Publish Date
Pages
384
Dimensions
6.1 X 1.3 X 9.3 inches | 1.49 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780393247879
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Jeremy Dauber is a professor of Jewish literature and American studies at Columbia University. He is the author of Jewish Comedy and The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem, both finalists for the National Jewish Book Award. He lives in New York City.

Reviews

This book is brilliant, endlessly revelatory, and Jeremy Dauber is that rare scholar and critic of real depth who doesn't just make his subject accessible but animates it with the strength of his prose. He's also one of the few writers I've encountered who can explain a joke without killing it. Bravo.--Sam Lipsyte, author of The Fun Parts
An erudite survey of the evolution and distinctiveness of Jewish humor. [Dauber] offers . . . a wide-ranging and insightful cultural analysis.
In this brilliant and groundbreaking book, Jeremy Dauber shows that Jerry Seinfeld and Sarah Silverman are just the latest members of an ancient tradition of Jewish humor that stretches all the way back to the Bible. Writing with dazzling scholarly insight and in a style as appealing as his subject, Dauber reveals what made Jews laugh over the centuries. In doing so, he tells a crucial part of the story of Judaism.--Adam Kirsch, author of The People and the Books
Dauber pulls off the impressive feat of discussing humor without sucking the life out of it in this insightful and funny analysis of Jewish humor. . . . Dauber has provided . . . the gold standard for understanding what people of any ethnicity, nationality, or political persuasion find funny, and why.
Dauber recognizes the multiplicity of Jewish humour and wisely resists any single characterisation of it. . . . [He] deftly surveys the whole recorded history of Jewish humour.
Both erudite and breezy. . . . Dauber's breadth left me breathless and his depth left me in his debt.--Adam Rovner
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