Isolationism: A History of America's Efforts to Shield Itself from the World

Available

Product Details

Price
$29.95  $27.55
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Publish Date
Pages
464
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.3 X 1.3 inches | 1.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780199393022

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About the Author

Charles A. Kupchan is Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. From 2014 to 2017, Kupchan served in the Obama administration as Special Assistant to the President onthe National Security Council. He also served on the National Security Council during the Clinton administration. He is the author of The End of the American Era (Knopf), How Enemies Become Friends (Princeton), and No One's World (Oxford).

Reviews


Comprehensive and objective, Kupchan's Isolationism is a useful contribution to the history and contemporary understanding of American isolationism. --Henry Kissinger, former United States Secretary of State


Isolationism is a carefully researched, clearly presented study of American foreign policy that demonstrates the enduring power of American skepticism about open-ended International commitments while making the case for continued American engagement. By grounding his policy arguments in a careful review of American history, Kupchan not only strengthens his case but sets an example which other policymakers would be wise to follow. --Walter Russell Mead, Distinguished Fellow in Strategy and Statesmanship, Hudson Institute; Professor of Foreign Affairs, Bard College; and Global View Columnist, The Wall Street Journal


This is a significant book. Kupchan has produced the first comprehensive study of American isolationism. He is totally fair-minded and unfailingly insightful in telling the story of isolationism from its origins at the founding of the Republic down to its resurgence at the outset of this new century. This is a book that everyone who cares about the past and present of American foreign policy should read. --John M. Cooper, Professor Emeritus of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison


At a time when the way forward in US foreign relations seems more uncertain than ever, Kupchan takes a timely, detailed, and unsparing look at the role of isolationism in the broad sweep of US history. The general reader, scholar, and policymaker can all profit from this compelling account. --Mary E. Sarotte, author of The Collapse


The battle for the future of America's foreign policy rages all around us. This learned, wise, and deeply engaged history of US isolationist impulses from the founding up to today is a much-needed book, and the selective commitments and judicious retrenchments it calls for are recipes for good policymaking. --Odd Arne Westad, Professor of History and Global Affairs, Yale University; author of The Cold War: A World History


At a time when many are urging America to retreat internationally, Kupchan's illuminating history of US foreign policy reminds us of isolationism's pitfalls as well as its continuing allure. Scholars and policy makers alike will benefit from this book's trenchant analysis of America's past and wise counsel about how to forge a more balanced, realistic, and enduring foreign policy going forward. --Peter Trubowitz, Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics


Charles Kupchan reminds us that a globally assertive foreign policy is more the exception than the norm in American history. Even those who do not fully agree with his arguments will find this book sharply argued, provocative, and engaging. --Hal Brands, Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)


In this timely, judicious, and thoughtful book, Kupchan adds depth and dimension to our understanding of the United States' foreign relations and the strategic choices now facing it. In tracing isolationism's origins to the earliest days of the Republic and showing its iterations in successive generations, he reminds us of how powerful a force it has been -- and remains. Essential reading both for those who are going to be in charge in the next years and for anyone who cares about the US and the world. --Margaret MacMillan, Professor of History, University of Toronto


Astute political history. --Kirkus


An erudite and evenhanded study of the isolationist impulse in American foreign policy. --Publishers Weekly


Isolationism is a deeply researched, fascinating look at how an urge to keep the world at bay has largely defined the United States and its foreign policy since the country's founding.--Foreign Policy


[A] valuable volume... compellingly demonstrates that the notion of American exceptionalism was as closely tied to isolationism-the 'city on a hill, ' standing above and apart from a quarrelsome world-as it later would be to the country's postwar internationalism.--Foreign Affairs


Isolationism arrives at a prescient moment.--Financial Times


Isolationism has many merits. It comprehensively describes the arc of American diplomatic history from George Washington's 'Farewell Address' to Donald Trump's redux of 'America First.' It is also eminently fair-minded, not only to the liberal internationalists and deep engagers whom Kupchan thinks have set America up for our post-Cold War fall but especially to the alternative grand strategic tradition that Kupchan fears has gotten a bad rap since World War II.--American Conservative


Isolationism has many merits. It comprehensively describes the arc of American diplomatic history from George Washington's 'Farewell Address' to Donald Trump's redux of 'America First.' It is also eminently fair-minded, not only to the liberal internationalists and deep engagers whom Kupchan thinks have set America up for our post-Cold War fall but especially to the alternative grand strategic tradition that Kupchan fears has gotten a bad rap since World War II.--Michael C. Desch, American Conservative