Inviting the Wolf in

Loren Niemi (Author) Elizabeth Ellis (Author)
Available

Description

Winner of the Storytelling World AwardA difficult story is any story whose content makes it challenging to tell or difficult to hear. Told for the wrong reasons, it can be as painful for the listener as for the teller. However, as we know from literature and media, Sophie's Choice to The Sixth Sense, told properly, a difficult story can powerfully alter not only he who tells it, but those who hear it. How can we tell the stories of wickedness and loss, sorrow and grief? How do we respectfully engage our audience and get to the core of a story's meaning? Niemi and Ellis begin with the assumption that it is essential and beneficial to tell difficult stories. Stopping our ears or stilling our tongues will not make tragedy go away; rather, the first step in ending suffering is to name it for what it is.

Product Details

Price
$15.95
Publisher
August House Publishers
Publish Date
January 10, 2006
Pages
192
Dimensions
5.45 X 0.56 X 8.44 inches | 0.53 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780874836233
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Lillian Morrison Bio: As the coordinator of young adult services at the New York Public Library, Lillian Morrison collected rhymes and chants from her young patrons that she later compiled into anthologies. Morrison also edited a collection of folk sayings, I Scream, You Scream: A Feast of Food Rhymes. A School Library Journal reviewer wrote that the book,"has the tone of something that really is for kids, who all know the magic of a good, loud chant. Put a copy on your shelf, then put your ear to the window at recess, and see if you don't hear some of these short verses rising up from the chaos of the schoolyard." "Lillian Morrison's contributions to the world of children's literature and librarianship were many," said Ellen Ruffin, curator of the de Grummond Collection at University of Southern Mississippi, where Morrison's papers are housed. "She spent more than forty years as a librarian and wrote children's poetry books, an unusual combination of both a writer and a practitioner - proof positive of her commitment to children and books." Her dedication to library services for children led to her receiving the ALA Grolier Award for her contributions in stimulating the interest of young readers. Nancy Dunaway Bio: Nancy Dunaway's work is a reflection of her life: very eclectic, a curious combination of objects often inspired by a glimpse of something natural and then taking a leap somewhere else. She has a very spiritual side and her work always reflects that component as well. She likes to think that her work tells stories of her journey along the path. Although her art is very specific to her life, she hopes that it connects with her audience to touch their life stories as well. She works in a variety of media and loves to explore the unique attributes of each form. Making her art is a dialogue between her, the process and the materials. She begins with a loose notion, then puts a mark or an image on canvas or paper. She gathers materials to assemble, and then, they guide her where to go next. As a result, her work is filled with a constant dialogue and surprises along the way.