Infamy: How One Woman Brought an International Sex Trafficking Ring to Justice

(Author)
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Product Details

Price
$18.95
Publisher
Soft Skull
Publish Date
Pages
356
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 1.1 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781593766436

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About the Author

Lydia Cacho is a Mexican journalist, author and a feminist activist. She has published seven books, one of them is the award-winning Manual to Prevent, Detect and Heal Child Sexual Abuse (Con Mi Hijo No). Currently Ms. Cacho is a columnist with El Universal, the main daily newspaper in Mexico, and a workshop teacher on successful approaches to help trafficking victims and on Community Schools for Peace: a holistic approach to negotiate conflicts.

Reviews

"A Mexican journalist bravely sets precedent in the highest court in targeting corruption and influence pedaling. . . . An important record of the incremental steps one journalist took against sexual violence in Mexico."--Kirkus

"Cacho is not somebody who can be silenced." --The Guardian

"Confronted by these abhorrent practices, Cacho tries to understand how, ethically, we as a society can allow sex slavery to exist and thrive. She boldly questions every aspect of our civilization, including sacrosanct values such as free speech, free markets, and liberty." --Bookslut

"Lydia Cacho is an impressive investigator renowned for pursuing stories often at great personal risk." --Socialist Review

"Lionhearted Mexican journalist and activist Cacho probes prostitution, pedophilia, and sex trafficking rings across Southeast Asia, South America, and beyond"--Publisher's Weekly

"Award-winning El Universal journalist Cacho has a history of crusading for human rights through her work. Here, she chronicles her global travels to document the world of human trafficking. [... She] is at her best when she loses herself in her interactions with her subjects; in those moments, the writing is so elegant that it purges memories of clunky exposition." --Kirkus Reviews