Indigo Girl

Available

Product Details

Price
$14.95  $13.75
Publisher
GemmaMedia
Publish Date
Pages
258
Dimensions
5.0 X 8.0 X 0.58 inches | 0.62 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781936846733
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Suzanne Kamata is the author A Girls' Guide to the Islands, also published Gemma Open Door for Literacy, as well as of the award-winning young adult novel Gadget Girl: The Art of Being Invisible and it's sequel Indigo Girl. Originally from Michigan, she now lives in Tokushima, Japan, with her family, and teaches EFL at Tokushima University. Suzanne holds an MFA from the University of British Columbia.

Reviews

"Kamata skillfully captures the angst of searching for self-identity, young love, and acceptance. Readers will relate to these universal themes no matter what cultural backgrounds they come from." - Maria Wen Adcock, BiculturalMama.com
"I feel a little guilty starting with a recommendation that's a sequel, but I was so excited to see this book come out in May that I had to review it.

"Let me give you a little background. In Kamata's first novel, Gadget Girl, Aiko is a fourteen-year-old girl who dreams of being a manga artist. She also has cerebral palsy that affects her left leg and arm. She's tired of living in the shadow of her mother, a famous sculptor. When they travel to Paris, she gets a chance to begin the process of redefining herself.

"In this sequel, Aiko's mother is remarried and home life has grown tense. So Aiko travels to Japan, to the indigo farm where her biological father lives with his extended family. It's a cross-cultural story of the best kind as Aiko pieces together her family's history and where, exactly she fits.

"Here's what's so great about these books: Aiko's voice is lovely. And the interwoven cultures are handled with depth and nuance. Lastly, and most importantly to me as an author of a book that features a character with special needs, Aiko's cerebral palsy is not center stage. It's part of her, but only a part, not the whole.

"I cannot recommend BOTH this book and the first one highly enough." --Jamie Sumner, author of Roll With It--Jamie Sumner "#READLAUGHLISTEN "
"[Gadget Girl] deftly handles many facets of the mixed-race/bicultural experience...narrator Aiko's life is a realistic mess of desires, fears, embarrassments, love and hope." - Finding Wonderland
"Gadget Girl: The Art of Being Invisible is an enjoyable, quick moving contemporary with a lot of heart and originality." - AliceMarvels.com
"Aiko spends the summer in rural Japan with her biological father in this sequel to Gadget Girl (2013). Aiko Cassidy feels like she doesn't fit in with the perfect family her mother has created with her Latinx stepfather and their new baby. Aiko is biracial (her mother is white) and has cerebral palsy. Hoping for a sense of belonging and some inspiration for her manga, Gadget Girl, she accepts her biological father's invitation to spend the summer with his family on their indigo farm in Japan. Aiko attends school with her half brother, goes on tours with her father and his wife, and tries to please her disapproving Obaachan. As long-buried family secrets emerge, Aiko's view of her entire family changes. Kamata has created another engaging coming-of-age story about finding one's place in the world. The inclusion of the Japanese language and cultural details adds richness to Aiko's journey of self-discovery. Past disasters that have deeply affected Japan--atomic bombs, earthquakes, and tsunamis--are in turn shown to influence Aiko's view of the world. So much happens in the book that some elements are not fully developed, and readers may be left wanting more resolution. However, overall the storylines weave together beautifully. A lovely sequel that focuses on finding strength in one's self and maintaining hope when all seems lost." (Fiction. 12-17) ----Kirkus "Kirkus Reviews "
"Gadget Girl is like a Japanese garden whose beauty reveals itself little by little. And the more attentive you are, the greater the beauty revealed. Aiko's journey toward acceptance of her uniqueness, which includes that which the world deems imperfect, is told with subtlety and humor. You are going to enjoy reading this book." - Francisco X. Stork, author of MARCELO IN THE REAL WORLD
"Kamata has created another engaging coming-of-age story about finding one's place in the world. The inclusion of the Japanese language and cultural details adds richness to Aiko's journey of self-discovery."--Kirkus "Kirkus Reviews "
"The sequel to Gadget Girl (GemmaMedia, 2013), this book continues the story of Aiko, a bicultural teenager with cerebral palsy and a passion for drawing manga. While fans will be pleased to see a natural progression of Gadget Girl, those meeting Aiko for the first time in Indigo Girl will be in no way disadvantaged.... Kamata's talent for pithy dialogue, coupled with the sensitive portrayal of teenage life, make this another winner for the Shikoku-based writer." --The Japan Times
Jul 20, 2019
In Indigo Girl, family relationships are more nuanced than they first appear
by Louise George Kittaka
Contributing Writer

The sequel to Gadget Girl (GemmaMedia, 2013), this book continues the story of Aiko, a bicultural teenager with cerebral palsy and a passion for drawing manga. While fans will be pleased to see a natural progression of Gadget Girl, those meeting Aiko for the first time in Indigo Girl will be in no way disadvantaged.

After growing up with her American mother in a "testosterone-free zone," as she wryly observes, Aiko's family has now expanded to include a stepfather and baby half sister, and the 15-year-old is questioning her place in this new order. She is excited about a summer trip to Japan, and the chance to meet her biological father for the first time, and to try on a new family for size. The reality, of course, is not what Aiko expects.

Her father is one of the few remaining farmers in Shikoku who grows and harvests indigo plants. Against the backdrop of life in this traditional area of Japan, Aiko gets to know her extended Japanese family and starts piecing together elements of her own complicated personal history. Author Suzanne Kamata includes enough detail to satisfy any curiosity about life in Japan as seen through her heroine's eyes, but it never weighs on the story.

Like many people her age, the forthright Aiko has a tendency to see things in black-and-white, but she begins to realize that family relationships can be as nuanced as the colors produced from her father's indigo plants. Kamata's talent for pithy dialogue, coupled with the sensitive portrayal of teenage life, make this another winner for the Shikoku-based writer. (c)2019 The Japan Times
"Indigo Girl is a complex yet beautiful maze of cultures and generations, in their sameness as well as differences. Kamata effectively juxtaposes Puccini's opera, Madame Butterfly, with the story of Aiko's parents, and goes on to talk about the difficulties of multi-cultural marriages and the things that go 'unsaid' because of personal constraints and societal expectations." ----Gracy Samjetsabam "Kitaab "