Igen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-And Completely Unprepared f

Jean M Twenge Phd (Author) Madeleine Maby (Read by)
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Product Details

Price
$39.99
Publisher
Simon & Schuster Audio
Publish Date
December 11, 2018
Dimensions
5.7 X 1.1 X 5.6 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Compact Disc
EAN/UPC
9781508281627

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About the Author

Jean M. Twenge, PhD, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, is the author of more than a hundred scientific publications and two books based on her research, Generation Me and The Narcissism Epidemic, as well as The Impatient Woman's Guide to Getting Pregnant. Her research has been covered in Time, The Atlantic, Newsweek, The New York Times, USA TODAY, and The Washington Post. She has also been featured on the Today show, Good Morning America, Fox and Friends, CBS This Morning, and National Public Radio. She lives in San Diego with her husband and three daughters.

Madeleine Maby is a voice talent and AudioFile Earphones Award--winning narrator.

Reviews

Twenge is the expert in the use of normative data, collected in systematic surveys over the years, to understand how the experiences, attitudes, and psychological characteristics of young people have changed over generations. Rigorous statistical analyses, combined with insightful interviews and excellent writing, create here a trustworthy, intriguing story.

-- "Peter Gray, research professor of psychology at Boston College and author of Free to Learn"

iGen is a game-changer and this decade's 'must-read' for parents, educators, and leaders. Her findings are riveting, her points are compelling, her solutions are invaluable.

-- "Michele Borba, EdD, educational psychologist and author of UnSelfie"

iGen will change the way you think about the next generation of Americans.

-- "Julianna Miner, professor of Public Health, George Mason University"