Husband and Wife

Zeruya Shalev (Author) Dalya Bilu (Translator)
Available

Description

A rising star of international letters, Zeruya Shalev takes us on a compelling narrative journey in the exquisite and unsettling Husband and Wife. Na'ama and Udi Newman have many of the trappings of an idyllic shared existence. A couple since they were schoolchildren, they have grown together like vines and settled into a routine of calm domesticity along with their young daughter, Noga.

But in a scene worthy of Kafka, the quiet rhythms of their family life suddenly screech to a halt when Udi wakes up one morning to find that he is unable to move his legs. The doctors quickly set about searching for a physical explanation, but it soon becomes painfully clear that his paralysis is a symptom of something far less tangible and far more insidious than any of them had imagined. This one morning sets in motion a series of events that reveals a vicious cycle of jealousy, paranoia, resentment, and accumulated injuries that now threaten to tear the small family apart. Shalev brilliantly captures the vulnerability and deceptive comforts of lives intertwined in this deeply disturbing portrait of a diseased marriage.

Product Details

Price
$13.00  $11.96
Publisher
Grove Press
Publish Date
October 07, 2003
Pages
311
Dimensions
5.52 X 0.82 X 8.22 inches | 0.85 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780802140098
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Gabriela Avigur-Rotem was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1946 and came to Israel in 1950. She holds a degree in Hebrew and English literature. She has taught literature at high school and directed writing workshops at Haifa and Ben Gurion Universities. She works as an editor at Haifa University Publishing House. Her novels include "Mozart Was Not a Jew", "Heatwave and Crazy Birds", and "Ancient Red".

Reviews

"A emotional white-knuckle ride . . . Reading work of this caliber in a first-class translation is a habit we should all cultivate."