How to Talk about Places You've Never Been: On the Importance of Armchair Travel

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Product Details

Price
$25.00
Publisher
Bloomsbury USA
Publish Date
Pages
208
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.0 X 0.8 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781620401378

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About the Author

Pierre Bayard is a professor of French literature at the University of Paris 8 and a psychoanalyst. He is the author of Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?, How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read, and Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong, among many others. He lives in Paris, France.

Reviews

"I probably shouldn't bring any of this up, but Mr. Bayard holds that one of the best reasons for reading a book is that it allows you to talk about yourself. "How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read "is an amusing disquisition on what is required to establish cultural literacy in a comfortable way. Lightly laced with irony, the book nonetheless raises such serious questions as: What are our true motives for reading? Is there an objective way to read a book? What do we retain from the books we've read?" --Joseph Epstein, "Wall Street Journal "on "How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read " "Witty and charming and often fun." --Sam Anderson, "New York Magazine "on "How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read " "It may well be that too many books are published, but by good fortune, not all must be read . . . A survivor's guide to life in the chattering classes . . . evidently much in need." "--""New York Times "on "How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read """ "In this hilarious and elaborate spoof, Bayard proves once again that being almost ridiculously erudite and screamingly funny are by no means mutually exclusive." "--""Booklist" on "How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read "
I probably shouldn't bring any of this up, but Mr. Bayard holds that one of the best reasons for reading a book is that it allows you to talk about yourself. H"ow to Talk About Books You Haven't Read" is an amusing disquisition on what is required to establish cultural literacy in a comfortable way. Lightly laced with irony, the book nonetheless raises such serious questions as: What are our true motives for reading? Is there an objective way to read a book? What do we retain from the books we've read?--Joseph Epstein "Wall Street Journal on HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN'T READ "
Witty and charming and often fun.""--Sam Anderson "New York Magazine on HOW TO TALK ABOUT BOOKS YOU HAVEN'T READ "

Bayard puts forth some interesting ideas about the capacity of literature to take readers to other worlds and the possible superiority of these experiences to physical travel. "Publishers Weekly"

I probably shouldn't bring any of this up, but Mr. Bayard holds that one of the best reasons for reading a book is that it allows you to talk about yourself. H"ow to Talk About Books You Haven't Read" is an amusing disquisition on what is required to establish cultural literacy in a comfortable way. Lightly laced with irony, the book nonetheless raises such serious questions as: What are our true motives for reading? Is there an objective way to read a book? What do we retain from the books we've read? Joseph Epstein, "Wall Street Journal on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read"

Witty and charming and often fun. Sam Anderson, "New York Magazine "on" How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read"

It may well be that too many books are published, but by good fortune, not all must be read . . . A survivor's guide to life in the chattering classes . . . evidently much in need. "New York Times on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read"

In this hilarious and elaborate spoof, Bayard proves once again that being almost ridiculously erudite and screamingly funny are by no means mutually exclusive. "Booklist on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read""

"Thoughtful and provocative." "Chicago Tribune"

Bayard puts forth some interesting ideas about the capacity of literature to take readers to other worlds and the possible superiority of these experiences to physical travel. "Publishers Weekly"

I probably shouldn't bring any of this up, but Mr. Bayard holds that one of the best reasons for reading a book is that it allows you to talk about yourself. H"ow to Talk About Books You Haven't Read" is an amusing disquisition on what is required to establish cultural literacy in a comfortable way. Lightly laced with irony, the book nonetheless raises such serious questions as: What are our true motives for reading? Is there an objective way to read a book? What do we retain from the books we've read? Joseph Epstein, "Wall Street Journal on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read"

Witty and charming and often fun. Sam Anderson, "New York Magazine "on" How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read"

It may well be that too many books are published, but by good fortune, not all must be read . . . A survivor's guide to life in the chattering classes . . . evidently much in need. "New York Times on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read"

In this hilarious and elaborate spoof, Bayard proves once again that being almost ridiculously erudite and screamingly funny are by no means mutually exclusive. "Booklist on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read""

"Thoughtful and provocative." Chicago Tribune

Bayard puts forth some interesting ideas about the capacity of literature to take readers to other worlds and the possible superiority of these experiences to physical travel. Publishers Weekly

I probably shouldn't bring any of this up, but Mr. Bayard holds that one of the best reasons for reading a book is that it allows you to talk about yourself. How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read is an amusing disquisition on what is required to establish cultural literacy in a comfortable way. Lightly laced with irony, the book nonetheless raises such serious questions as: What are our true motives for reading? Is there an objective way to read a book? What do we retain from the books we've read? Joseph Epstein, Wall Street Journal on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

Witty and charming and often fun. Sam Anderson, New York Magazine on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

It may well be that too many books are published, but by good fortune, not all must be read . . . A survivor's guide to life in the chattering classes . . . evidently much in need. New York Times on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

In this hilarious and elaborate spoof, Bayard proves once again that being almost ridiculously erudite and screamingly funny are by no means mutually exclusive. Booklist on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

"

"Thoughtful and provocative." --Chicago Tribune

"Bayard puts forth some interesting ideas about the capacity of literature to take readers to other worlds and the possible superiority of these experiences to physical travel." --Publishers Weekly

"I probably shouldn't bring any of this up, but Mr. Bayard holds that one of the best reasons for reading a book is that it allows you to talk about yourself. How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read is an amusing disquisition on what is required to establish cultural literacy in a comfortable way. Lightly laced with irony, the book nonetheless raises such serious questions as: What are our true motives for reading? Is there an objective way to read a book? What do we retain from the books we've read?" --Joseph Epstein, Wall Street Journal on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

"Witty and charming and often fun." --Sam Anderson, New York Magazine on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

"It may well be that too many books are published, but by good fortune, not all must be read . . . A survivor's guide to life in the chattering classes . . . evidently much in need." --New York Times on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

"In this hilarious and elaborate spoof, Bayard proves once again that being almost ridiculously erudite and screamingly funny are by no means mutually exclusive." --Booklist on How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read