How to Cook a Moose: A Culinary Memoir

Kate Christensen (Author)
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Product Details

Price
$24.95
Publisher
Islandport Press
Publish Date
October 13, 2015
Pages
296
Dimensions
6.36 X 0.74 X 9.22 inches | 1.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781939017734
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Kate Christensen is the author of five novels and one memoir. Her novel, The Great Man, appeared on the New York Times Bestseller list and won her the 2008 Pen/Faulkner Award for fiction. Her previous novels are In the Drink (1999), Jeremy Thrane (2001), and The Epicure's Lament (2004). Her fifth novel, Trouble (2009), was released in paperback by Vintage/Anchor in June 2010. Her sixth novel, The Astral, was published in hardcover by Doubleday in June 2011. Her most recent book, "Blue Plate Special: An Autobiography of My Appetites," was published in July 2013 by Doubleday. She is a graduate of Reed College and the Iowa Writers Workshop. Her essays, articles, reviews, and stories have appeared in many anthologies and periodicals, including The New York Times Book Review, O, the Oprah Magazine, Gilt Taste, Bookforum, Elle, The Wall Street Journal, Tin House, The Wilson Quarterly, The B&N Review, and Fivechapters.com. Her food-related blog, "don't let it bring you down," can be accessed at katechristensen.wordpress.com.

Reviews

"As a stand-alone, the book serves up heartfelt reflections on the food history of Maine and insights into the ways we build community, meal by meal. It illuminates, through rich, meaty portraits of the chefs, foragers, fishermen, hunters, and farmers who make up the culinary fabric of the state. As a continuation of the social and culinary classic "How to Cook a Wolf," it leaves the reader hungry for more."--Simran Sethi, The Los Angeles Review of Books

"As a stand-alone, the book serves up heartfelt reflections on the food history of Maine and insights into the ways we build community, meal by meal. It illuminates, through rich, meaty portraits of the chefs, foragers, fishermen, hunters, and farmers who make up the culinary fabric of the state. As a continuation of the social and culinary classic How to Cook a Wolf, it leaves the reader hungry for more."

--Simran Sethi, The Los Angeles Review of Books