How I Became a Spy: A Mystery of WWII London

Available

Product Details

Price
$16.99  $15.63
Publisher
Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers
Publish Date
February 12, 2019
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.7 X 8.5 X 1.0 inches | 0.8 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780399557064

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About the Author

DEBORAH HOPKINSON has written more than 40 books for young readers. She is the author of the middle-grade novels The Great Trouble: A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel; A Bandit's Tale: The Muddled Misadventures of a Pickpocket; and Into the Firestorm: A Novel of San Francisco, 1906. Her picture books include Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt; Sky Boys: How They Built the Empire State Building, an ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book and a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book; Abe Lincoln Crosses a Creek, an ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book and a Junior Library Guild Selection; A Boy Called Dickens; and the ALA Notable Book Apples to Oregon. Visit her at DeborahHopkinson.com and follow her at @deborahopkinson.

Reviews

"Ms. Hopkinson slips lots of age-appropriate wartime history and a number of real individuals (including Eisenhower)--as well as practical details about codes and ciphers and how to break them--into this info-packed adventure for sleuth-loving readers." --The Wall Street Journal

"This middle grade mystery novel starts with a bang and sends readers on a breakneck journey through World War II London." --School Library Journal

"Hopkinson has written a cleverly plotted, page-turning mystery that vividly evokes wartime Britain... Fans of puzzles, mysteries, and historical fiction will be delighted by Hopkinson's latest." --Booklist

"Red herrings, a poignant Bradshaw family backstory, ciphers to decode, a subplot regarding a young Jewish refugee friend of Bertie's, cameos by real-life historical figures (General Eisenhower and his dog; cipher expert Leo Marks)--there's certainly no shortage of entry points for young readers, and never a dull moment." --The Horn Book