Home Waters: A Chronicle of Family and a River

Available

Product Details

Price
$25.99  $23.91
Publisher
Custom House
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.75 X 8.5 X 1.0 inches | 0.95 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780062944597

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About the Author

JOHN N. MACLEAN is an award-winning author and journalist. He spent thirty years at the Chicago Tribune, most of that time as a Washington correspondent. After leaving the Tribune, Maclean wrote five nonfiction books about wildland fire that are considered a staple of fire literature as well as training material for firefighters. Maclean is the son of Norman Maclean, author of A River Runs Through It. The younger Maclean, an avid fly fisherman, lives in Washington, DC, and at a family cabin in Montana.

Reviews

Maclean reflects on fishing, family, and the timeless novella that made his father famous.--Angler's Journal
"A moving memoir of a family's love affair with the Blackfoot River in Montana. ... Lovers of literature and nature will be captivated by this heartfelt tribute to place and family."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
Finally, a brilliant, intimate, and reliable chronicle of the remarkable Maclean family and the origins of a great book, welded seamlessly to the memorable angling days and writing life of a central member. I loved Home Waters. --Nick Lyons, author of Spring Creek
"John Maclean's Home Waters is a wonderful reflection on how a sense of place and shared activity, especially sport, defines our lives, our families, and the meaning we find in them."--David Brooks, executive director, Montana Trout Unlimited
"Maclean's Hemingway-esque prose is as clear as a mountain stream, flowing with a poetic cadence and lyrically describing the many splendid natural treasures to be found under the Big Sky. A sure bet for readers who enjoy American and natural history and a must-read for fishing enthusiasts."--Booklist
"Maclean offers a lyrical love letter to Montana's Blackfoot River, fishing, and his storied family in this captivating memoir. ... Fans of his father's novella will relish the details that served as its inspiration and are here rendered in Maclean's sharp yet poetic prose. ... This richly observed narrative is sure to reel readers in."--Publishers Weekly
"A lyrical companion to his father's classic, chronicling their family's history and bond with Montana's Blackfoot River. His storytelling -- from the fishing with his dad to the life and death of his uncle Paul -- is reliable, elegant and charming. ... Spectacularly vivid and personal. ... While Maclean's journalistic prose is sharp and concise, it can also be beautiful." --Washington Post
The prose in Home Waters, which is often transporting, flows with a shadow-cast grace. ... The best word I can think of to describe Home Waters also happens to be the Maclean's family word: beautiful.--Field & Stream
A memoir about the Maclean family's four-generation tie to Montana's Blackfoot River that elaborates on the back story of Norman Maclean's extraordinary 1976 novella A River Runs Through It.--Wall Street Journal
"In this welcome companion to an American classic, John N. Maclean casts a story of place, family, and legacy: of highland streams and woodlands, and the gifts waiting in their depths; of a quiet father with much to share; and of the sometimes meandering, sometimes tumbling courses that carry us through life. A spare, patient, and compelling reminiscence that stays with you."--Earl Swift, New York Times bestselling author of Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island
I can honestly say I loved Home Waters. Reading it felt like a visit with old friends--the characters from A River Runs through It--who you haven't seen in a long while, during which you learned some things you'd never known before. John N. Maclean's book does a wonderful job of illustrating the importance of family and place--something we can all relate to even if the particulars of our stories are very different.--Kirby Lambert, Montana Historical Society
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