Harbart

Nabarun Bhattacharya (Author) Sunandini Banerjee (Translator)
& 1 more
Available

Description

At twenty, however, he suddenly seems to possess the gift of speaking with the dead. Herbert is bathed in glory. From less than zero to starry heights--what an apotheosis. The wheel of fortune turns again, all too soon...
Legendary, scathingly satiric, wildly energetic, deeply tender, Herbert is an Indian masterwork.

Product Details

Price
$13.95  $12.83
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
June 25, 2019
Pages
112
Dimensions
5.1 X 0.5 X 7.9 inches | 0.3 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811224734
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

NABARUN BHATTACHARYA (1948-2014) was an Indian Bengali writer who was committed to a revolutionary and radical aesthetics. He was the only child of the acclaimed actor and playwright Bijon Bhattacharya and the writer and activist Mahashweta Devi. The author of a dozen major novels, the most famous of which is Herbert, he was also a poet.

Sunandini Banerjee is a Calcutta-based graphic artist and editor who has illustrated books by Thomas Bernhard, Yves Bonnefoy and Ivan Vladislavic, among others.

Reviews

Bhattacharya occupies an uneasy place in the pantheon of Bengali greats--celebrated, disillusioned, and most subversive.
An astonishing novel, zany, terrifying, and liberating in equal measure, by a writer who was a visionary.--Siddharta Deb
What is needed [now] is a kind of novel that attends to how society is being organized by certain vested interests; a novel that goes to the heart--rather, goes for the jugular--of the economic system itself. Harbart is prophetic of this tradition to come.
Harbart is a haunted man--a victim-participant in the forward march of capitalism and of the impetus to assign significance to the pointlessness and chaos of material existence. Banerjee's acrobatic translation is both enormously fun and true to the radical content.-- (06/17/2019)
A remarkable resurrection, one that erupts full-blooded, alive with laughter, stink and rage.--John Domini (07/22/2019)
Harbart reads like Rainer Maria Rilke's Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge set in Calcutta. Featuring a young man with an open channel to the dead who drinks and grieves to excess, it is a mosaic of manic and immersive episodes. It is a spinning drunken stumble through a city that feels menacingly sensual.-- (06/03/2019)