Happy Thanksgiving, Snoopy!

Charles M. Schulz (Author) Jason Cooper (Adapted by)
& 1 more
Available

Description

Give thanks with Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and the rest of the Peanuts gang in this 8x8 storybook all about Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving is not working out the way Charlie Brown expected this year. His Grandma had to cancel dinner and now he's stuck at home. For Snoopy, it's shaping up to be a pretty typical Turkey Day: He has no plans, and no one has invited him anywhere. He's just going to play it 'Joe Cool' and pretend he's not lonely. Luckily, Charlie Brown and friends realize that if they want any kind of Thanksgiving celebration they're going to have to throw it themselves...at Joe Cool's 'dorm!' It's a nontraditional Thanksgiving, spent with people they weren't expecting to hang out with, but it's one they'll always be thankful for. After all, Thanksgiving is not really about what or where you eat, but about who you get to spend time with!

(c) 2018 Peanuts Worldwide LLC

Product Details

Price
$4.99  $4.59
Publisher
Simon Spotlight
Publish Date
September 04, 2018
Pages
24
Dimensions
7.8 X 7.7 X 0.2 inches | 0.1 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781534425286

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About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).

In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post--as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.

He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts--and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.

Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day--and the day before his last strip was published--having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand--an unmatched achievement in comics.
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Scott Jeralds is a 30-year animation industry veteran who has worked for companies including Marvel Studios, Hanna-Barbera Studios, M.G.M. Animation, Warner Bros., and Porchlight Entertainment. A graduate of California Institute of the Arts, Scott has worked on TV series such as The Flintstones, Yogi Bear, Scooby-Doo, The Jetsons, Krypto the Superdog, Tom and Jerry, The Pink Panther, Superman, Secret Saturdays, and directed the cartoon series Freakazoid, for which he earned an Emmy Award. In addition, Scott has designed cartoon-related merchandise, licensing art, and artwork for several comic and children's book publications.