Grandmothers: A Family Portrait

(Author) (Contribution by)
Available

Product Details

Price
$26.95
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Publish Date
Pages
408
Dimensions
5.54 X 7.53 X 0.91 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780299150242
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Glenway Wescott (1901-1987) was born in Kewaskum, Wisconsin. He was raised on a farm with an extended family, and The Grandmothers was his first major literary work. Among his other books are Goodbye, Wisconsin: The Apple of the Eye: and Pilgrim Hawk. Wescott's journals from 1937 to 1955 were published by Farrar Strauss Giroux under the title Continual Lessons in 1990.

Reviews

""The Grandmothers" is made out of thick, rich layers of human problems and personalities. To read "The Grandmothers" is to be washed by waves of cleansing pity."--Harry Salpeter, "New York World", 1927

"The Grandmothers" is made out of thick, rich layers of human problems and personalities. To read "The Grandmothers" is to be washed by waves of cleansing pity. Harry Salpeter, "New York World," 1927
"
The Grandmothers is made out of thick, rich layers of human problems and personalities. To read The Grandmothers is to be washed by waves of cleansing pity. Harry Salpeter, New York World, 1927
"
Distinguished by sensitive interpretation . . . an epic of the pioneer family. . . . It was the grandmothers who made America, and the grandfathers submitted to them their own and the nation s destiny. John Carter, New York Times Book Review, 1927
"
"The Grandmothers is made out of thick, rich layers of human problems and personalities. To read The Grandmothers is to be washed by waves of cleansing pity."--Harry Salpeter, New York World, 1927

"Distinguished by sensitive interpretation . . . an epic of the pioneer family. . . . It was the grandmothers who made America, and the grandfathers submitted to them their own and the nation's destiny."--John Carter, New York Times Book Review, 1927