German Autumn

Stig Dagerman (Author) Robin Fulton MacPherson (Translator)
& 1 more
Available

Product Details

Price
$17.95
Publisher
University of Minnesota Press
Publish Date
October 06, 2011
Pages
120
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.3 X 0.5 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780816677528
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Stig Dagerman (1923-1954) was regarded as the most talented young writer of the Swedish postwar generation. By age twenty-six he had published four novels, a collection of short stories, and four full-length plays, in addition to German Autumn.

Robin Fulton Macpherson is a Scottish poet and translator who has lived and worked in Norway since 1973.

Mark Kurlansky is a New York Times best-selling author of many books, including Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World and Salt: A World History.

Reviews

"Dagerman wrote with beautiful objectivity. Instead of emotive phrases, he uses a choice of facts, like bricks, to construct an emotion."--Graham Greene
"German Autumn is one of the best collections ever written about the aftermath of war. It is on par with John Reed's classic articles from the Soviet Union as well as with Edgar Snow's articles about the great political revolution in China. Stig Dagerman depicts the tragic realities of post-World War II Germany with astonishing clarity and artistic skillfulness. He provides the reader with a profound insight, which ultimately is the story of every war. To anyone interested in understanding what great journalism means, German Autumn is indispensable. It should be compulsory reading for all young people who might consider becoming a journalist, and it is as alive as it was when first published in 1947. Read it."--Henning Mankell
"German Autumn is a very important book and it is a very good thing that an English language version is becoming available for Americans. We need this book. "--Mark Kurlansky, from the Foreword