Genesis: The Deep Origin of Societies

Edward O. Wilson (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$23.95
Publisher
Liveright Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
March 19, 2019
Pages
160
Dimensions
5.4 X 0.8 X 8.3 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781631495540

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About the Author

Edward O. Wilson is the author of more than thirty books, including Anthill, Letters to a Young Scientist, and The Conquest of Nature. The winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, Wilson is a professor emeritus at Harvard University and lives with his wife in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Reviews

The acclaimed naturalist delivers a pithy summary of evidence for Darwinian evolution of human behavior.... A magisterial history of social evolution, [and] lucid, concise overview of human evolution that mentions tools and brain power in passing but focuses on the true source of our pre-eminence: the ability to work together.--Kirkus Reviews [starred review]
Arresting.... Deeply informative and provocative.--Ray Olson, Booklist
In his characteristically clear, succinct, and elegant prose, one of our grand masters of synthesis, Edward O. Wilson, explains here no less than the origin of human society.--Richard Rhodes, winner of the Pulitzer Prize
Endlessly fascinating, Edward O. Wilson - in the tradition of Darwin - plumbs the depths of human evolution in a most readable fashion without sacrificing scholarly rigor.--Michael Ruse, author of A Meaning of Life
Genesis is a beautifully clear account of a question that has lain unsolved at the core of biology ever since Darwin: how can natural selection produce individuals so altruistic that, rather than breeding themselves, they help others to do so?--Richard Wrangham, author of The Goodness Paradox
Genesis is a beautifully clear account of a question that has lain unsolved at the core of biology ever since Darwin: how can natural selection produce individuals so altruistic that, rather than breeding themselves, they help others to do so?--Richard Wrangham, author of The Goodness Paradox