Funland: A Visual Tour of the British Seaside

Rob Ball (Author)
Available

Description

-From Blackpool to Brighton and Barry Island to Brightlingsea, these richly-detailed photographs capture the candyfloss colors and faded nostalgia of a seaside culture that is peculiarly (yet wonderfully) British From Blackpool to Brighton, the pastel colors, faded arcades and worn-out carpets of British coastal towns evoke a particular nostalgia. With the changing tides of the British political landscape these traditional resorts appear fragile and some are falling into disrepair. Nevertheless, some are thriving and all retain a special charm and retro appeal. Shooting for more than a decade since 2009, Rob Ball has documented over thirty-five coastal towns. His images serve as a record of a unique culture that is at risk of disappearing forever.

Product Details

Price
$40.00
Publisher
Hoxton Mini Press
Publish Date
July 15, 2019
Pages
128
Dimensions
11.5 X 0.7 X 9.4 inches | 2.05 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781910566510

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About the Author

Beginning in the darkroom of a London newspaper at the age of eighteen, Rob Ball has been a photographer for over twenty years. He spent time working as a news, sport and crime scene photographer before shifting to long-form personal projects while lecturing at Canterbury Christ Church University. Since moving to the coast in 2009, the majority of Rob's personal projects have focused on the coastline and our interaction with it. Funland is his third publication that documents visually-rich coastalscapes and their constantly shifting communities. Rob has exhibited his work internationally and continues to work on projects and commissions while lecturing. He still lives by the sea.

Reviews

His latest, Funland, captures more than 35 British coastal communities, from Arbroath on Scotland's North Sea coast to Torquay on the English Riviera.--Simona Tselova "The Guardian, May, 2019 "