Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019

Available

Product Details

Price
$32.00  $29.44
Publisher
One World
Publish Date
Pages
528
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.2 X 1.8 inches | 1.8 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780593134047

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About the Author

Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News correspondent. He is the author of many books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and three #1 New York Times bestsellers, How to Be an Antiracist; Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored with Jason Reynolds; and Antiracist Baby, illustrated by Ashley Lukashevsky. In 2020, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Keisha N. Blain is an award-winning historian, professor, and writer. She is currently an associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh, the president of the African American Intellectual History Society, and an editor for The Washington Post's Made by History section. Her writing has appeared in popular outlets such as The Atlantic, The Guardian, Politico, and Time. She is the author of Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom and Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America.

Reviews

"This engrossing collection is divided into ten parts, each covering forty years, and each part ends with a poem that captures the essence of the preceding essays. . . . The brief but powerful essays . . . feature lesser-known people, places, ideas, and events as well as fresh, closer looks at the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the Harlem Renaissance, Brown v. Board of Education, the Black Power movement, the war on drugs, Hurricane Katrina, voter suppression, and other staples of Black American history and experience. Poignant essays by Bernice L. McFadden on Zora Neale Hurston, Salamishah Tillet on Anita Hill, and Kiese Laymon ("Cotton 1804-1809") deftly tie the personal to the historical. Every voice in this 'cabinet of curiosities' is stellar. . . . An impeccable, epic, essential vision of American history as a whole and a testament to the resilience of Black people."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"An engrossing anthology of essays, biographical sketches, and poems by Black writers tracing the history of the African American experience from the arrival of the first slaves in 1619 to the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement . . . With a diverse range of up-and-coming scholars, activists, and writers exploring topics both familiar and obscure, this energetic collection stands apart from standard anthologies of African American history."--Publishers Weekly