First Steps: How Upright Walking Made Us Human

Available

Product Details

Price
$27.99  $25.75
Publisher
Harper
Publish Date
Pages
352
Dimensions
5.9 X 9.0 X 1.4 inches | 1.15 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780062938497

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Jeremy DeSilva is an anthropologist at Dartmouth College. He is part of the research team that discovered and described two ancient members of the human family tree--Australopithecus sediba and Homo naledi. He has studied wild chimpanzees in Western Uganda and early human fossils in museums throughout Eastern and South Africa. From 1998 to 2003, he worked as an educator at the Boston Museum of Science. He continues to be passionate about science education and travels throughout New England, giving lectures on human evolution. He and his wife, Erin, live in Norwich, Vermont, with their twins, Ben and Josie.

Reviews

"Master anatomist and paleontologist Jeremy DeSilva makes no bones about the fact that when looking at fossils 'I let myself be emotional...' Thus does this world expert and gifted story teller take us on a tour through the sprawling, complicated, saga of human origins. Drawing on his personal knowledge of topics ranging from sports medicine to childcare and his acquaintance with a host of colorful characters--whether lying inert in museum drawer, sitting behind microscopes or feuding with one other--DeSilva adds flesh and projects feelings onto the bones he studies, a tour de force of empathic understanding."--Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, author of Mother Nature and Mothers and Others: The evolutionary origins of mutual understanding
"Before our ancestors thought symbolically, before they used fire, before they made stone tools, or even entered the open savanna, our ancestors walked upright. In one way or another, this odd locomotory style has underwritten the whole spectrum of our vaunted human uniquenesses, from our manual dexterity to our hairless bodies, and our large brains. In the modern world it even influences the way other people recognize us at a distance, and it is crucial to our individual viability. In this authoritative but charmingly discursive and accessible book, Jeremy DeSilva lucidly explains how and why."--Ian Tattersall, author of Masters of the Planet and The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack
"It should come as no surprise that walking matters. But what will surprise most readers is how and why. DeSilva takes us on a brilliant, fun, and scientifically deep stroll through history, anatomy, and evolution, in order to illustrate the powerful story of how a particular mode of movement helped make us one of the most wonderful, dangerous and fascinating species on Earth." --AgustΓ­n Fuentes, Professor of Anthropology, Princeton University and author of Why We Believe: Evolution and the Human Way of Being
DeSilva makes a solid scientific case with an expert history of human and ape evolution . . . Accessible, valuable popular anthropology.--Kirkus Reviews