Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science

Jeannine Atkins (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$18.99
Publisher
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publish Date
September 20, 2016
Pages
208
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.9 X 8.4 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781481465656

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About the Author

Jeannine Atkins is the author of several books for young readers about courageous women, including Finding Wonders: Three Girls Who Changed Science, Grasping Mysteries: Girls Who Loved Math, Stone Mirrors: The Sculpture and Silence of Edmonia Lewis, and Borrowed Names: Poems about Laura Ingalls Wilder, Madam C.J. Walker, Marie Curie, and Their Daughters. Jeannine teaches writing for children and young adults at Simmons University. She lives in western Massachusetts. Visit her at JeannineAtkins.com.

Reviews

* "Vividly imagines the lives of three girls who grew up to become famous for their achievements in science. . . . Atkins has a knack for turning a phrase. . . . Science is woven through the narratives, but within the fabric of the characters' daily lives and family struggles. . . . each of these three perceptive portrayals is original and memorable."--Booklist, starred review
"Evocative and beautiful. Highly recommended for fans of poetry about the natural world and the lives of real people."--School Library Journal
* "Distinguished for both content and elegance. . . . Readers are lured in by strong openings and vivid storytelling. . . . With each chaptered poem a gem in its own right, this collection will appeal to poetry lovers as well as awakening scientists."--BCCB, starred review
"Atkins guides readers through the themes that connect the women's scientific quests, from a boundary-pushing desire for knowledge . . . to the satisfaction they find in their work."--Horn Book
"Inspirational and informative, Atkins shows how pursuing one's passion for science, math, or any field considered nontraditional is worth the risk."--Kirkus Reviews