Final Harvest: Poems

Available

Description

The richest and most authoritative selected volume of Emily Dickinson's poems.
Here is the best of Emily Dickinson's poetry -- 576 poems that fully and fairly represent not only the complete range of Dickinson's poetic genius but also the complexity of her personality, the fluctuation of her mood, and the development of her style. Final Harvest is the first selected volume of Dickinson's work that draws from all 1,775 of her poems -- poems of such startling originality that they were doomed to obscurity in Dickinson's own lifetime.
"We have had to wait more than a century and a quarter for Final Harvest, the first truly selected poems of Emily Dickinson...In its own and special way, this book stands like a monument at the end of a very long road in literary history." --Christian Science Monitor

Product Details

Price
$15.00  $13.80
Publisher
Back Bay Books
Publish Date
January 30, 1964
Pages
352
Dimensions
5.4 X 1.0 X 8.2 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780316184151

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was born in Amherst, Massachusetts. After an unusually thorough education for a woman of her time, she began writing poems that drew on her wide knowledge of literature, scripture, and the political discourse of her day. Dickinson fell in love several times during her life but never married, preferring instead to live an increasingly secluded life. She entrusted a number of poems to a well-known editor but published only one poem under her name during her lifetime. With the posthumous publication of her work she was soon recognized as one of the world's great poets.

Reviews

"We have had to wait more than a century and a quarter for Final Harvest, the first truly selected poems of Emily Dickinson...In its own and special way, this book stands like a monument at the end of a very long road in literary history."--Christian Science Monitor