Figments of Reality: The Evolution of the Curious Mind

Jack Cohen (Author) Ian Stewart (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$29.99  $27.59
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
September 09, 1999
Pages
340
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.97 X 0.85 inches | 1.24 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780521663830

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

Reviews

"A stimulating theory of how mind, consciousness, and culture have coevolved to create our species by two masters of informed, scientific speculation. Try it...you'll learn a lot. Who could ask for more?" John L. Casti, Santa Fe Institute and Technical University of Vienna, author of Would-Be Worlds
"The most thought-provoking book I've read all year." Terry Pratchett, author of the Discworld series
"Figments of Reality is highly recommended for college-level collections and any non-specialist general reader." Bookwatch
"While the subject matter is rather heady, the authors are quickwitted and provide a lively exposition." Science News Books
"A delightful read that is excellent for academic collections and general collections with a highly literate readership." Mark L. Shelton, Library Journal
"[The authors] are witty, erudite, clever, and generally clear-headed in this rationalist's view of the universe and human evolution...delightful..." Library Journal
"Stewart and Cohen show how intelligence and extelligence interact by way of language and how the end product formulates culture...the authors are quick-witted and provide a lively exposition." Science News
"It analyzes the evolution of mankind's consciousness from a new and intriguing perspective. It argues that the mind evolved in the context of culture and language, aiding survival in a complex and competitive world." Biology Digest
"One of the most heartening and innovative books of the year...This kind of book explodes the notion of the imminent and final theory of everything; by the same token, it shows that the death of science has been greatly exaggerated." The Sunday Times of London