Fear: A Cultural History

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Product Details

Price
$18.95  $17.43
Publisher
Counterpoint LLC
Publish Date
Pages
500
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 1.4 inches | 1.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781593761547
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Joanna Bourke is Professor of History in the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College, where she has taught since 1992. She is a Fellow of the British Academy. Her books range from the social and economic history of Ireland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to social histories of the British working classes between 1860 and 1960s, to cultural histories of military conflict between the Anglo-Boer war and the present. She explores history through the lens of gender, ivtersectionalities, and subjectivities. She has worked on the history of the emotions, particularly fear and hatred, and the history of sexual violence. In the past few years, her research has focused on questions of humanity, militarisation, and pain. She wrote a book entitled What It Means to Be Human. In 2014, she published two books: Wounding the World: How Military Violence and War Games Invade Our World and The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers.

Reviews

"Bourke performs a sterling service, painstakingly picking over usually bypassed sources and materials for hidden clues as to what scares us."
"รTยจhis book considers things that go bump in the night and why they scare us from a social sciences perspective. . . . รAยจ well-written discussion of fear and trembling."
"รBourkeยจ raises a wry, cool eyebrow at the hyperbole of hysteria. She assesses risk rather than quavers before it. She puts fear in its proper place--as part of our pattern of life. . . . This is a journey full of wit and scholarship, an enthralling read that makes you inspect your own psyche. . . . Turn inwards and you may never be quite so afraid again."