Fancy Goods/Open All Night

Paul Morand (Author) Marcel Proust (Preface by)
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Available

Description

The reputation of Paul Morand (1888-1976) rests squarely upon his short stories from the 1920s, which introduced a fresh and exuberant style into postwar French letters. Yet in spite of his immense popularity and later prestige (he was elected to the Academie Française in 1968), he has remained largely unknown to English-speaking readers. Ezra Pound, shortly after arriving in Paris in 1920, made contact with Morand and, always ready to champion new and distinct voices, was soon translating his short stories for the British publishers Chapman and Dodd. In the end, however, the translations were rejected as ''unsuitable, '' partially on the grounds of sexual frankness. The typescripts, left for safekeeping with William Bird's Paris-based Three Mountains Press, were rediscovered in the mid-1970s and are published here for the first time.

As might be expected, the energy and originality of Morand's style is matched by Pound's inventive genius. Thus, the texts offer us not only access to a significant French writer long neglected here but an opportunity to re-evaluate the role and dimension of translation in Pound's own work.

Product Details

Price
$16.95
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
March 01, 1984
Pages
176
Dimensions
5.24 X 0.47 X 7.91 inches | 0.42 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811208895
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust (10 July 1871 - 18 November 1922), better known as Marcel Proust, was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time; earlier rendered as Remembrance of Things Past), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927: Swann's Way, In the Shade of Blooming Young Girls, The Guermantes Walk, Sodom and Gomorrah, The Captive Girl, Vanished Albertine, and Time Found Again. He is considered by English critics and writers to be one of the most influential authors of the 20th century. Begun in 1909, when Proust was 38 years old, À la recherche du temps perdu consists of seven volumes. Graham Greene called Proust the "greatest novelist of the 20th century", and W. Somerset Maugham called the novel the "greatest fiction to date." Proust died before he was able to complete his revision of the drafts and proofs of the final volumes, the last three of which were published posthumously and edited by his brother, Robert. The book was translated into English by C. K. Scott Moncrieff, appearing under the title Remembrance of Things Past between 1922 and 1931. Scott Moncrieff translated volumes one through six of the seven volumes, dying before completing the last. This last volume was rendered by other translators at different times. The title In Search of Lost Time, a literal rendering of the French, has gained usage in modern times.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was one of the most influential poets of the 20th Century and perhaps the key figure in defining and promoting Anglo-American poetic modernism. The Cantos - an epic poem written over 50 years - is his major poetic work.

Reviews

"The sheer shapeliness of his prose recalls Hemingway; the urbanity of his self-destructiveness compares with Fitzgerald's; and his camera eye is as lucidly stroboscopic as that of Dos Passos. He is, like Victor Segalen, Blaise Cendrars, Valery Larbaud, and Saint-John Perse, one of the great nomads of 20th-century French literature, racing through the apocalypse with the haste and glamor of an Orient Express. It is a pity we should have had to wait this long to catch up with him via Pound." --The New York Times