Everything But the Coffee: Learning about America from Starbucks

Bryant Simon (Author)
Available

Description

Everything but the Coffee casts a fresh eye on the world's most famous coffee company, looking beyond baristas, movie cameos, and Paul McCartney CDs to understand what Starbucks can tell us about America. Bryant Simon visited hundreds of Starbucks around the world to ask, Why did Starbucks take hold so quickly with consumers? What did it seem to provide over and above a decent cup of coffee? Why at the moment of Starbucks' profit-generating peak did the company lose its way, leaving observers baffled about how it might regain its customers and its cultural significance? Everything but the Coffee probes the company's psychological, emotional, political, and sociological power to discover how Starbucks' explosive success and rapid deflation exemplify American culture at this historical moment. Most importantly, it shows that Starbucks speaks to a deeply felt American need for predictability and class standing, community and authenticity, revealing that Starbucks' appeal lies not in the product it sells but in the easily consumed identity it offers.

Product Details

Price
$35.94
Publisher
University of California Press
Publish Date
February 09, 2011
Pages
304
Dimensions
5.77 X 8.69 X 0.81 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780520269927

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About the Author

Bryant Simon is Professor of History and the Director of American Studies at Temple University and the author, most recently, of Boardwalk Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America.

Reviews

"Simon's book is a fascinating, sometimes dispiriting look at how Starbucks is emblematic of some deeper socioeconomic phenomena at work in this country over the past decade and a half."--Mike Miliard"Boston Phoenix" (12/09/2009)
"Those who frequent Starbucks will enjoy Simon's range of topics, from business matters to the music played to the (very American) concept of 'self-gifting.'"--Publishers Weekly (12/07/2009)
"A thoughtful, in-depth study."--World Wide Work (04/25/2010)