Embodied: An Intersectional Feminist Comics Poetry Anthology

Available

Product Details

Price
$16.99  $15.63
Publisher
Wave Blue World Inc
Publish Date
Pages
200
Dimensions
6.46 X 8.98 X 0.47 inches | 0.93 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781949518139

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About the Author

Wendy Chin-Tanner has been nominated for the 2012 Best of the Net Award and her poems, essays, and interviews have appeared in numerous journals including The Mays Anthology of Oxford and Cambridge, The Saint Ann's Review, and The Raintown Review. She is a founding editor at Kin Poetry Journal (wearekin.org), poetry editor at Stealing Time Magazine and The Nervous Breakdown, staff interviewer at Lantern Review, co-founder of A Wave Blue World (publisher of graphic novels) and an online sociology instructor at Cambridge University, UK. Wendy lives in Portland.

Reviews

FOREWORD (STARRED) -- Verse and visuals meet, with spectacular results, in the graphic anthology Embodied. Poetry is a visual medium, not just an oral one: the placements of words and blank spaces are often intended to appeal to the eye, and they affect the interpretation and enjoyment of a poem. This book makes full use of the opportunities for color and page design that are inherent to comic books-here, used to maintain or enhance the impact of poems. The poems and their graphic interpretations come from a lineup of award-winning women, trans, and nonbinary creators. After each artist's adaptation, the original text-only version of the poem is included, allowing for interesting comparisons. Some adaptations preserve the original appearance of the text, while others take a different tack, splitting or combining lines for a particular effect. The art is attractive and imaginative. In "Bassam," a metaphor is depicted as something more than just a figurative truth: "Each morning my heart is / a vulture beating its wings for scraps," it says. The words are accompanied by images of a scavenger alighting on a shoulder. Images from the poems are given form and shape, sometimes with daring, unexpected approaches, and always in ways that are complementary. The variation among the art and writing styles keeps every segment fresh and exciting. A study guide forwards two stimulating questions about each poem, regarding their subjects, techniques, and interpretations-enough discussion material to fill a university-level course. Also included are rough sketches from the various adaptations-a fascinating glimpse into artistic processes.
This book bridges the gap between comics and poetry, combining the best of both worlds. With a portion of the proceeds benefiting the International Women's Health Coalition, Embodied is a wonderful book that's well worth engaging.



One more to add.

"This ambitious anthology of feminist comics poetry aims high, and soars." -- PUBLISHERS WEEKLY


BOOKLIST -- The pages of this anthology run the gamut of emotion and experience. The authors, representing a diverse selection, share 21 poems of joy, rage, sorrow, and defiance that are both beautifully illustrated and printed on standalone pages, letting readers see how the words can be shaped on their own. Artists provide artwork that illuminates the Narratives and emphasizes the mood and tone of the accompanying words. Themes of femininity and womanhood are presented in many ways, such as the straightforwardly named Poem, "[You know what living means? Tits out, tits in the rain. Tits]," and the hopeful "To the cherry blossoms on 16th and Wharton." Back matter includes an extensive study guide, useful as a teaching tool and for anyone curious about influences and references found in several of the works. Many of the questions encourage interactivity, asking readers to consider their positions, their politics, and their own creativity. Recommended for those who would appreciate a thoughtful and vibrant dive into the art of cis female, trans, and nonbinary poets.


"There were some entries that I didn't feel a connection to. Maybe it was the approach or maybe the topic is something I can't relate to due to my own experience and background, but that may be the best thing about this anthology. That's what makes it inclusive and necessary. There is a story in there for everyone and an art style to suit different tastes, moods, and aesthetics. If you are looking for representation, it is in here. We are currently in a period of history where so much is changing but resistance against acceptance is still present. Works such as this, however, are a step in the right direction." - THE BEAT