Divided Highways: Building the Interstate Highways, Transforming American Life (Updated)

(Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$20.95  $19.27
Publisher
Cornell University Press
Publish Date
Pages
416
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 1.1 inches | 1.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780801478222

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About the Author

Tom Lewis is Professor of English at Skidmore College. He is the author of Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio and The Hudson: A History, as well as researcher, writer, or producer for documentary films including Brooklyn Bridge, The Shakers, and Empire of the Air (all directed by Ken Burns) and Divided Highways (directed by Larry Hott and Diane Garey).

Reviews

"Divided Highways is the best and most important book yet published about how asphalt and concrete have changed the United States. Quite simply, the Interstate Highway System is the longest and largest engineered structure in the history of the world, and it has enormously influenced every aspect of American life. Tom Lewis is an engaging prose stylist with a gift for the telling anecdote and appropriate example."

--Kenneth T. Jackson "Harvard Design Magazine "

"A fascinating work... with a subject central to contemporary life but to which few, if any, have devoted so much thoughtful analysis and good humor."

--Minneapolis Star-Tribune

"Anyone who has ever driven on a U.S. interstate highway or eaten at an exit-ramp McDonald's will come away from this book with a better understanding of what makes modern America what it is."

--Chicago Tribune

"Lewis describes in a convincing, lively, and well-documented narrative the evolution of America's roadway system from one of the world's worst road networks to its best."

--John Pucher "Journal of the American Planning Association "

"Lewis provides a comprehensive and balanced examination of America's century-long infatuation with the automobile and the insatiable demands for more and better road systems. He has written a sprightly and richly documented book on a vital subject."

--Richard O. Davies "Journal of American History "

"This brightly written history of the U.S. federal highway program is like the annual report of a successful company that has had grim second thoughts. The first half recounts progress made, while the second suggests that the good news is not quite what it seems."

--Publishers Weekly