Discrepant Engagement: Dissonance, Cross-Culturality and Experimental Writing

Nathaniel Mackey (Author)
Available

Description

Discrepant Engagement addresses work by a number of authors not normally grouped under a common rubric--black writers from the United States and the Caribbean and the so-called Black Mountain poets. Nathaniel Mackey examines the ways in which the experimental aspects of their work advance a critique of the assumptions underlying conventional perceptions and practice. Arguing that the work of these writers engages the discrepancy between presumed norms and qualities of experience such norms fail to accommodate, Mackey highlights their valorization of dissonance, divergence and formal disruption. He advances a cross-cultural mix that is uncommon in studies of experimental writing, frequently bringing the works and ideas of the authors it addresses into dialogue and juxtaposition with one another, insisting that parallels, counterpoint and relevance to one another exist among writers otherwise separated by ethnic and regional boundaries.

Product Details

Price
$44.95
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
April 30, 2009
Pages
328
Dimensions
6.0 X 0.73 X 9.0 inches | 1.06 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780521109994
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Nathaniel Mackey was born in Miami, Florida in 1947. He is the author of several books of poetry, fiction, and criticism, and has received many awards for his work, including the National Book Award in poetry for Splay Anthem, the Stephen Henderson Award from the African American Literature and Culture Society, and the Bollingen Prize from the Beinecke Library at Yale University. Mackey is the Reynolds Price Professor of English at Duke University, and edits the literary journal Hambone.

Reviews

"...an exciting collection of essays that promote what Cornel West calls 'dedeisciplinizing modes of knowing.'" Michael Coyle, American Literature