Democratic Rights: The Substance of Self-Government

Available

Product Details

Price
$26.95
Publisher
Princeton University Press
Publish Date
Pages
184
Dimensions
6.14 X 0.41 X 9.21 inches | 0.61 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780691149301

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About the Author

Corey Brettschneider is assistant professor of political science and public policy at Brown University.

Reviews

"No problem of democratic theory is more formidable than how to reconcile majority rule with respect for individual rights. Democratic Rights is an original and compelling contribution to this debate--one that will affect the course of democratic theory for years to come. Among its most provocative and ingenious arguments is its case for the illegitimacy of the death penalty and the political parity of property and welfare rights under a democratic constitution. The prose is a model of compact lucidity."--Eamonn Callan, Stanford University
"First-rate. In a consistently accessible style, Corey Brettschneider presents a clear, innovative argument that he sustains in an elegant and economical way throughout."--Simone Chambers, University of Toronto
"This ambitious book establishes its author as a scholar setting out a distinctive and credible position within liberal democratic theory. Clear and accessible, it reaches eminently reasonable conclusions on a range of policy issues, and develops a theoretical structure that can be used to apply the author's recommended 'middle course' (between 'pure proceduralist' democrats and 'nondemocratic' liberals) directly to constitutional law and matters of basic justice."--Leif Wenar, University of Sheffield
"Develops a 'value theory of democracy' grounded in political autonomy, equality of interests, and reciprocity."---Nina C. Ayoub, Chronicle of Higher Education
"[B]rettschneider has produced an innovative, imaginative new perspective on judicial review. He makes a persuasive case that democracy itself demands the legal recognition of certain substantive rights....[N]o one interested in rights or democratic theory can afford to ignore this book."---A.D. Sarat, Choice
"Democratic Rights is not only ambitious but distinctive . . . and marked by virtues that one does not always find in such books, being clearly written, carefully argued, and admirably concise. It is a book, in short, that is well worth the attention of democratic theorists and anyone who wants to know how far contractualism can take us in political and legal philosophy."---Richard Dagger, Criminal Law and Philosophy
"One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2007"