"dearest Georg": Love, Literature, and Power in Dark Times: The Letters of Elias, Veza, and Georges Canetti, 1933-1948

Elias Canetti (Author) Vesa Canetti (Author)
& 2 more
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Product Details

Price
$24.95
Publisher
Other Press (NY)
Publish Date
February 02, 2010
Pages
436
Dimensions
6.0 X 2.0 X 8.5 inches | 1.29 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781590512975
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Elias Canetti (1905--1994), Bulgarian-born author of the novel Auto-da-Fรฉ, the sociological study Crowds and Power, and three volumes of memoirs (The Tongue Set Free, The Torch in My Ear, and The Play of the Eyes), won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1981. Canetti most recently made headlines with the posthumously published autobiographical notes on his years in England, Party in the Blitz: The English Years (New Directions, 2005).

Veza Canetti
(1897--1963), playwright, novelist, and short-story writer, was born in Vienna. After the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany in 1938, she and her husband, Elias Canetti, fled Vienna for London. She gained literary recognition only posthumously. She is the author of the novels Yellow Street and The Tortoises (New Directions, 2005).

David Dollenmayer
is Professor of German at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the author of The Berlin Novels of Alfred Dรถblin. He has translated works by Peter Stephan Jungk, Michael Kleeberg, Anna Mitgutsch, Perikles Monioudis, Mietek Pemper, and Moses Rosenkranz. He lives in Hopkinton, Massachusetts.

Reviews

"In 2003, a large packet of letters was discovered accidentally in a steamer trunk in a Paris basement: they were written to Georges Canetti from his brother, Elias (1981 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature), and Elias's wife, Veza, along with some of Georges's letters to them. Appearing now for the first time in English in Dollenmayer's splendid translation, the correspondence reveals a quite passionate relationship among the three...Although Elias has controlled his image through his memoirs, these letters offer a glaringly honest glimpse into this triangular relationship."--Publishers Weekly