Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787 (Revised)

Gordon S. Wood (Author)
Available

Description

During the Revolutionary era, American political theory underwent a fundamental transformation that carried the nation out of a basically classical and medieval world of political discussion into a milieu that was recognizably modern. This classic work is a study of that transformation. Gordon Wood describes in rich detail the evolution of political thought from the Declaration of Independence to the ratification of the Constitution and in the process greatly illuminates the origins of the present American political system. In a new preface, Wood discusses the debate over republicanism that has developed since - and as a result of - the book's original publication in 1969.

Product Details

Price: $39.95
Publisher: Omohundro Institute and University of North C
Published Date: April 06, 1998
Pages: 675
Dimensions: 6.04 X 1.58 X 9.02 inches | 1.98 pounds
Language: English
Type: Paperback
ISBN: 9780807847237

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About the Author

Gordon S. Wood is Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History at Brown University.

Reviews

One of the half dozen most important books ever written about the American Revolution.

"New York Times Book Review"
"If ever a work of history merited the appellation 'modern classic, ' this is surely one.

"William and Mary Quarterly""
"This is an admirable, thoughtful, and penetrating study of one of the most important chapters in American history.

Wesley Frank Craven"
If ever a work of history merited the appellation 'modern classic, ' this is surely one.

"William and Mary Quarterly"
ÝA¨ brilliant and sweeping interpretation of political culture in the Revolutionary generation.

"New England Quarterly"
This is an admirable, thoughtful, and penetrating study of one of the most important chapters in American history.

Wesley Frank Craven
[A] brilliant and sweeping interpretation of political culture in the Revolutionary generation.

"New England Quarterly"