Consent: A Memoir

Available

Product Details

Price
$27.99  $25.75
Publisher
Harpervia
Publish Date
Pages
208
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.1 X 1.1 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780063047884

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About the Author

Vanessa Springora is a French writer and editor. Consent is her first book.

Reviews

A fierce account from a woman hoping to wrest her story back. Recommended Reading.--Library Journal
Springora's lucid account is a commanding discussion of sexual abuse and victimization, and a powerful act of reclamation.--Booklist
"The story delivered is reminiscent of that of a pact with the devil and the reference to fairy tales (Bluebeard in particular) highlights the importance of the theme of sexual predator in literature, including children's literature. Love must be there in wonder; in the case of the sexual predator, the stupor is not that of joy but that of Evil. To write it is to exorcise it, in the strong sense; to receive this testimony is to accompany this disenchantment and to get out of the state of torpor in which conformism, indifference or complacency always threaten to plunge us." --Elodie Pinel, La Revue Γ‰tudes
"By coldly dismantling the mechanism, the cogs and the collusions, Vanessa Springora transcends the personal framework and questions society as a whole. In this, Consent is a book that counts, far beyond testimony." --Nicole Grudlinger


"A piercing memoir about the sexually abusive relationship she endured at age 14 with a 50-year-old writer...This chilling account will linger with readers long after the last page is turned." --Publishers Weekly
A chilling story of child abuse and the sophisticated Parisians who looked the other way...[Springora] is an elegant and perceptive writer.--Kirkus Reviews
...One of the belated truths that emerges from [Consent] is that Springora is a writer. [...]Her sentences gleam like metal; each chapter snaps shut with the clean brutality of a latch.--The New Yorker