Compassionate Conservatism: What It Is, What It Does, and How It Can Transform

Marvin Olasky (Author) George W. Bush (Foreword by)
Available

Product Details

Price
$15.99
Publisher
Free Press
Publish Date
July 13, 2010
Pages
240
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.5 X 0.55 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781451612943

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About the Author

Marvin Olasky is Professor of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin and a Senior Fellow at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty. He is the author of more than a dozen books of history and policy analysis, and the editor of World, a weekly news magazine from a Christian perspective. He has been an adviser to George Bush since 1993

Reviews

Stephen Goldsmith former Mayor of Indianapolis Marvin Olasky has long been in the forefront of new ways to help impoverished neighborhoods and individuals. His new book shines a bright light on the appropriate role of government, community, and faith, and will help all those looking for answers.
Senator John Ashcroft (Missouri) What is compassion? How can this good and generous nation best help transform the lives of Americans struggling to overcome the ravages of drug addiction, crime, broken homes, and poverty? Marvin Olasky offers fresh and compelling answers to these pressing questions in "Compassionate Conservatism." Marvin Olasky's seminal work on the failures of Washington's old welfare system is a shining beacon of hope to men, women, and children who want to change their lives and claim the American dream of hope, self-reliance, and independence.
Senator Rick Santorum (Pennsylvania) Once again, Marvin Olasky defines the moment. He unveils the human face of the movement with which many of us identify, and shows that our objective is not political posturing, but helping real people with real needs -- truly transforming lives. His roadmap to practical and policy prescriptions will help shape the national debate -- not whether to care for those in need, but how best to.