Capital Is Dead: Is This Something Worse?

McKenzie Wark (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$24.95  $22.95
Publisher
Verso
Publish Date
October 08, 2019
Pages
208
Dimensions
5.6 X 0.8 X 8.4 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781788735308

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About the Author

McKenzie Wark is the author of A Hacker Manifesto, Gamer Theory, 50 Years of Recuperation of the Situationist International, and The Beach Beneath the Street, among other books. They teach at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College in New York City.

Reviews

"A provocative and compelling exploration of our digital world as it crashes towards ecological disaster. Counterintuitive, insightful, and imaginative, Capital is Dead is a timely reminder that there are things worse than capitalism--and we may just be living through them."
--Nick Srnicek, author of Platform Capitalism

"A feral form of commodification walks among us. Whether it is feasting on the remains of capital or hunting on its behalf is a question McKenzie Wark is perfectly equipped to investigate. Consider this your exploratory field guide to a new mode of production."
--Kate Crawford, Distinguished Research Professor and cofounder of the AI Now Institute, New York University

"McKenzie Wark's call for an experimental, vulgar form of revolutionary approach to digital commodification is a challenging read, full of provocative observation."
--Andy Hedgecock, Morning Star

"Wark has long been a brilliant scholar of Marxism, Situationism and Poststructuralism, rewriting the canon of critical theory."
--Dave Beech, Art Monthly

"Thoughtful and compelling."
--Garrett Pierman, Marx & Philosophy

"Wark takes a flamethrower to these ideas through a reading of Marx that burns away the metaphors of phantasmagorical fetishes, such as the commodity form, the spectacle, and false consciousness, that have occupied much critical theory to date."
--Vince Carducci, Popmatters