Brothers Down: Pearl Harbor and the Fate of the Many Brothers Aboard the USS Arizona

Available

Product Details

Price
$18.99  $17.47
Publisher
Back Bay Books
Publish Date
November 24, 2020
Pages
368
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.2 X 1.2 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780316560528

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About the Author

Walter R. Borneman is the author of nine works of nonfiction, including MacArthur At War, The Admirals, Polk, and The French and Indian War. He holds both a master's degree in history and a law degree. He lives in Colorado.

Reviews

"This well-organized book is a poignant look at the brothers who were serving aboard the USS Arizona...The moving and unusual angle, excellent research, and the prose's clarity and emotion make this one a winner. "--Publishers Weekly
"A fresh account of a well-documented historical event...Borneman's extensive research turns up interesting details...Borneman's broad knowledge and sensitive touch make it an entirely worthwhile experience."--Kirkus
"Many other books have detailed the events leading up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. But few of them have done so from the perspective of the sailors and Marines who were victimized that day, and none has used the unique point of view of the thirty-eight sets of brothers who were on board the ill-fated USS Arizona. By focusing on these eighty or so individuals from small towns and big cities, Borneman provides not only a unique frame of reference on the day of infamy, but a rich portrait of America in 1941."--Craig L. Symonds, author of World War II at Sea
"Walter Borneman is one of our finest historians, and in Brothers Down he has given us his most personal and affecting story-and one so immersive I often found myself holding my breath while reading his powerful account of the attack on the Arizona. It's that good."--James Donovan, author of Shoot for the Moon and A Terrible Glory
"A memorable book, one more telling of that awful day, and the different ways it ravaged families."--Wall Street Journal