Bones, Stones and Molecules: Out of Africa and Human Origins

David W. Cameron (Author) Colin P. Groves (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$73.14
Publisher
Academic Press
Publish Date
May 20, 2004
Pages
400
Dimensions
6.04 X 0.71 X 8.94 inches | 1.43 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780121569334
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

David W. Cameron completed his PhD in 1995 and was subsequently awarded an Australian Research Council (ARC) Post Doctoral Fellowship at the Australian National University, followed by an ARC QEII Fellowship at the University of Sydney. He has published a number of books on Australian military history and science and over sixty research papers in internationally peer reviewed journals.David's passion for recording the overarching history of Gallipoli has resulted in six books on the subject. He is also internationally known as an expert on primate and human evolution and has a degree in both archaeology and palaeoanthropology.David was born in 1961 in Darlinghurst and grew up in Bondi before moving to Campbelltown in the early 1970's when it was still a 'town'. He graduated with 1st Class Honours from the University of Sydney (Prehistory) in 1989 and with a PhD from the Australian National University (Palaeoanthropology) in 1995.He was formerly an Australian Research Council QEII Fellow at the Department of Anatomy & Histology at the University of Sydney. He has conducted numerous international archaeological and palaeonathropological excavations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. David is married with three children (and two dogs).

Reviews

I was keenly anticipating this book, for I have the highest opinion of the work of both Cameron and Groves. I was not disappointed, for it is a thoroughly researched and entertaining book....Its strength lies in the wonderful clarity in which the principles of phylogenetic analysis are laid out and then applied rigorously to the hominid fossil record. Although many will disagree with the conclusions, they will be able to do so more readily because the analyses are so clearly set out, both the characters used and the methods. --Peter Andrews, Natural History Museum, London, England

"This is a detailed treatment which is sure to stimulate consideable debate and argument." --David Pilbeam, Peabody Museum, Harvard University

Although fairly academic in approach, this is still a very readable and well-illustrated overview. --Douglas Palmer, NEW SCIENTIST