Blood and Smoke: A True Tale of Mystery, Mayhem, and the Birth of the Indy 500

Available

Product Details

Price
$18.00
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Publish Date
Pages
288
Dimensions
5.85 X 9.08 X 0.82 inches | 0.72 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781439149058

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Charles Leerhsen was formerly an executive editor at Sports Illustrated. He has written about sports and culture for Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Esquire, The New York Times, and People, as well as Sports Illustrated. A native of the Bronx, he now lives in Brooklyn with his wife, the writer Sarah Saffian.

Reviews

"Leerhsen provides an entertaining history of the automobile's growth in the early twentieth century. . . . Along the way, readers are treated to sharply humorous social commentary bolstered by fascinating details of Indianapolis life and industry."

"

--Booklist

"
"Entertaining . . . and snarkily humorous."

--Rusty Blackwell, "Automobile

"
"When you read this gripping account of the first Indy 500 run May 30, 1911, you'll wonder why they ever had a second."

--Doug Clark, "Greensboro News-Record" (NC)


"With alternating tales of horrifying crashes and the schemes of Carl Fisher, who promoted the Indianapolis Speedway as a venue for airplane races, this is a ripping good yarn of America in the early 20th century. Leerhsen, a witty storyteller, draws from contemporary articles, histories, and interviews to pull readers into a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the building of the Speedway and the first race.... this book has broad appeal, with laugh-out-loud stories and characters who would be unbelievable if they turned up in fiction. Highly recommended."

"--Library Journal", starred review
"Should be required reading for anybody with so much as a vague interest in the birth of the Speedway and the 500."

--Bob Kravitz, "The Indianapolis Star

"
On the centennial of the Indy 500, controversy still reigns over who won the inaugural race, as this lively account of a tumultuous event makes plain.

History comes alive through the research and prose of Leerhsen ("Crazy Good: The Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America," 2008), formerly the executive editor of "Sports Illustrated. "The early days of auto racing ignited plenty of controversy--whether it was even a sport, whether it should be allowed (it seemed far more dangerous than bullfighting, outlawed in the States) and whether, as the "New York Times" wrote in an editorial headlined "Slaughter as a Spectacle," the races "bring out the very worst of human nature by providing a most barbarous form of excitement...They are an amusement congenial only to savages and should be stopped." If such controversy didn't already give this book enough of a charge, the characters do, led by the entrepreneurial racetrack co-founder "Crazy" Carl Fisher, whose own wife characterized her impulsive, adulterous, reckless spouse as a "lusty and incomprehensible personality." Then there are drivers such as Barney Oldfield, "the Daredevil Dean of the Roaring Road" who "didn't have an altruistic bone in his body, but he had a very low threshold of boredom, and plain-vanilla racing excited him as much as it did the average citizen." For years, plain vanilla appeared to be the only alternative to banishment, as the fledgling sport succumbed to offering a series of short races, much like horse racing, rather than the longer ones that would be more likely to push drivers to destruction and even death. "Which was, of course, why a lot of people came to the auto races," writes Leerhsen. "Not to see death, exactly, in most cases--but to spend some time luxuriating in its titillating possibility." And a surprising number of those most titillated were women, as the macho sport proved quite the chick magnet, and anything that suggested strategy was dismissed as "weakness, eve

s