Black Men Built the Capitol: Discovering African-American History in and Around Washington, D.C.

Jesse Holland (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$22.95
Publisher
Lyons Press
Publish Date
September 01, 2017
Pages
216
Dimensions
6.2 X 8.9 X 0.6 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781493029686

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About the Author

Jesse J. Holland is a nationally recognized journalist and media personality from Washington, D.C., who for years has combined his work as Congressional Legal Affairs Writer for the world's largest news organization, The Associated Press, with a love of African American history and news.In addition to being responsible for coverage of the confirmation process of the last three Supreme Court justice candidates -- Justices John Roberts and Samuel Alito, and failed nominee Harriet Miers -- Holland has written hundreds of stories about African-American politics, history, and news for the New York Times and for The Associated Press in Washington; Columbia, South Carolina; and Albany, New York.In 2004, Holland became the first African-American ever elected to the Congressional Standing Committee of Correspondents, a congressionally created committee of journalists elected by their Washington, D.C., peers to represent the Congressional Press Corps in front of the Senate and the House of Representatives.Holland has appeared as a guest on African American and Washington political topics on C-SPAN's "Washington Journal," ABC's "News Now," and WHUT-TV's "Evening Exchange with Kojo Nnamdi," as well as being the former host of "The Wednesday Agenda" radio talk show on WUMS-FM in Oxford, Mississippi, and former guest on the "Inside Albany" political television show in Albany, New York, and WIS-TV's "Newswatch" in Columbia, South Carolina.Holland is a member of the prestigious National Press Club, the National Association of Black Journalists, and the Washington Association of Black Journalists and is one of the creators of the former newspaper comic strip "Hippie and the Black Guy." He is also a co-founder of two NABJ chapters, the University of Mississippi Association of Black Journalists, and the South Carolina Midlands Association of Black Journalists. He is an active member of the Washington Press Club Foundation, which promotes and provides funding for aspiring female and minority journalists.Originally from Holly Springs, Mississippi, Holland graduated from the University of Mississippi with degrees in journalism and English. While at Ole Miss, he was only the second African-American editor of the daily campus newspaper, The Daily Mississippian. He now lives in the historically African-American section of Washington, D.C.'s Capitol Hill neighborhood with his wife Carol.

Reviews

About Jesse Holland's The Invisibles: 'Jesse J. Holland's riveting book The Invisibles shines a long overdue light on the enslaved men and women who were forced to serve in the nation's seat of executive power--The White House. Not only does Holland reveal this ugly chapter of American history with sharp analysis and insight, he reveals the blatant hypocrisy of the nation's presidents and other leaders in permitting such a system of forcible servitude to exist. More importantly, he brings to life the stories and experiences of this group of nearly forgotten African Americans, who showed remarkable courage and resilient character despite being imprisoned by slavery in the heart of the so-called 'land of the free.''--J.D. Dickey, author of Empire of Mud: The Secret History of Washington, DC "Oney Judge, who dared to flee to freedom from George Washington's household. Edith Hern Fossett, a chef trained to prepare French delicacies for Thomas Jefferson. Andrew Jackson's wily jockeys. Jesse J. Holland makes visible the courage, expertise and fortitude of the slaves held by U.S. presidents. Holland's contribution to a complete history of our complex nation is one worth savoring."--Donna Bryson, author of It's A Black White Thing