Bird Songs Don't Lie: Writings from the Rez

Available

Product Details

Price
$25.00  $23.00
Publisher
Heyday Books
Publish Date
Pages
240
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.1 X 0.9 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781597143974

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About the Author

Gordon Lee Johnson, Cahuilla/Cupeño, lives and writes on the Pala Indian Reservation. A former newspaperman, he was last a columnist and feature writer for the Press-Enterprise, covering Southern California's Inland Empire. Prior to journalism, he studied literature and philosophy at the Universities of California at Santa Cruz, San Diego, and Berkeley. He graduated with a degree in creative writing from Vermont College and went on to earn a master of fine arts from Antioch University, where he concentrated on Native fiction. He is currently enrolled in the Institute of American Indian Arts' MFA screenwriting program. Johnson has a book of newspaper columns called Rez Dogs Eat Beans that was translated and published in the Czech Republic. In 2007, Heyday published another compilation of his newspaper columns titled Fast Cars and Frybread. He is the former Indigenous Writer in Residence for the School of Advanced Research in Santa Fe. He has four children, eleven grandchildren, and a feral tabby cat named Trouble who growls from the back porch when hungry.
Deborah A. Miranda is an enrolled member of the Ohlone Costanoan Esselen Nation of California, and is also of Chumash and Jewish ancestry. The author of two poetry collections--Indian Cartography, which won the Diane Decorah Award for First Book from the Native Writer's Circle of the Americas, and The Zen of La Llorona, nominated for the Lambda Literary Award--she also has a collection of essays, The Hidden Stories of Isabel Meadows and Other California Indian Lacunae, forthcoming from the University of Nebraska Press. Miranda is an associate professor of English at Washington and Lee University and says reading lists for her students include as many books by "bad Indians" as possible.