Bin Laden's Bald Spot: & Other Stories: & Other Stories

(Author)
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Product Details

Price
$16.95  $15.59
Publisher
Red Hen Press
Publish Date
Pages
160
Dimensions
5.0 X 7.9 X 0.5 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781597099158
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Brian Doyle is the editor of Portland Magazine at the University of Portland, in Oregon--the best university magazine in America, according to Newsweek, and "the best spiritual magazine in the country," according to Annie Dillard.

Doyle is the author of ten previous books: five collections of essays, two nonfiction books (The Grail, about a year in an Oregon vineyard, and The Wet Engine, about the "muddles & musics of the heart"), two collections of short prose, and the sprawling novel Mink River, which Publishers Weekly called an "original, postmodern, shimmering tapestry of smalltown life."

Doyle is a four-time finalist for the Oregon Book Award, and his essays have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, Orion, The American Scholar, and in newspapers and magazines around the world. His essays have also been reprinted in the annual Best American Essays, Best American Science & Nature Writing, and Best American Spiritual Writing anthologies. Among various honors for his work are a Catholic Book Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and a 2008 Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

He once made the all-star team in a Boston men's basketball league, and that was a really tough league. He lives near Portland, Oregon with his wife and children.

Reviews

"Brian Doyle's spirit is catching: it will catch you up, and soon you will have caught on to everything he feels and ruminates over and marvels at, and you will comprehend what poetry is and does."
--Cynthia Ozick


"Virginia Wolff addressed what she called the Common Reader--Brian Doyle doesn't have any of those. His readers turn instantly and preternaturally uncommon, seeing and feeling and noticing and knowing what they have never before taken in: a kind of laughing piercing antic holiness. To read Brian Doyle is to apprehend, all at once, the force that drives Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman, and James Joyce, and Emily Dickinson, and Francis of Assisi, and Jonah under his gourd. Brian Doyle is an extraordinary writer whose tales will endure. The sublime 'Waking the Bishop' is going to inhabit American anthologies forever and ever."
--Cynthia Ozick


"Virginia Wolff addressed what she called the Common Reader--Brian Doyle doesn't have any of those. His readers turn instantly and preternaturally uncommon, seeing and feeling and noticing and knowing what they have never before taken in: a kind of laughing piercing antic holiness. To read Brian Doyle is to apprehend, all at once, the force that drives Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman, and James Joyce, and Emily Dickinson, and Francis of Assisi, and Jonah under his gourd. Brian Doyle is an extraordinary writer whose tales will endure. The sublime 'Waking the Bishop' is going to inhabit American anthologies forever and ever."
--Cynthia Ozick

"Some people can write. Some people can feel. Brian Doyle, born with a silver tongue and a big heart, is among the lucky few who can do both."
--Anne Fadiman

"What I like about Brian Doyle's writing is that it's real--it's got mud and blood and tears but it's also got earthly angels who teach him to grasp on to each small epiphany as it opens before him."
--Martin Flanagan

"Brian Doyle has a fine quick mind alert for anomaly and quirk-none of them beyond his agile pen."
--Peter Matthiessen

"Virginia Woolf addressed what she called the Common Reader--Brian Doyle doesn't have any of those. His readers turn instantly and preternaturally uncommon, seeing and feeling and noticing and knowing what they have never before taken in: a kind of laughing piercing antic holiness. To read Brian Doyle is to apprehend, all at once, the force that drives Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman, and James Joyce, and Emily Dickinson, and Francis of Assisi, and Jonah under his gourd. Brian Doyle is an extraordinary writer whose tales will endure. The sublime 'Waking the Bishop' is going to inhabit American anthologies forever and ever."
--Cynthia Ozick

"Brian Doyle's writing is driven by his passion for the human, touchable, daily life, and equally for the untouchable mystery of all else... his gratitude, his sweet lyrical reaching, is a gift to us all."
--Mary Oliver

"No one writes prose with the verve and honesty, the gusto and wit of Brian Doyle."
--Pattiann Rogers

Virginia Woolf addressed what she called the Common Reader Brian Doyle doesn t have any of those. His readers turn instantly and preternaturally uncommon, seeing and feeling and noticing and knowing what they have never before taken in: a kind of laughing piercing antic holiness. To read Brian Doyle is to apprehend, all at once, the force that drives Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman, and James Joyce, and Emily Dickinson, and Francis of Assisi, and Jonah under his gourd. Brian Doyle is an extraordinary writer whose tales will endure. The sublime Waking the Bishop is going to inhabit American anthologies forever and ever.
Cynthia Ozick"

Brian Doyle has a fine quick mind alert for anomaly and quirk-none of them beyond his agile pen.
Peter Matthiessen"

No one writes prose with the verve and honesty, the gusto and wit of Brian Doyle.
Pattiann Rogers"

Some people can write. Some people can feel. Brian Doyle, born with a silver tongue and a big heart, is among the lucky few who can do both.
Anne Fadiman"

What I like about Brian Doyle s writing is that it s real it s got mud and blood and tears but it s also got earthly angels who teach him to grasp on to each small epiphany as it opens before him.
Martin Flanagan"

Brian Doyle s writing is driven by his passion for the human, touchable, daily life, and equally for the untouchable mystery of all else his gratitude, his sweet lyrical reaching, is a gift to us all.
Mary Oliver"

Virginia Woolf addressed what she called the Common Reader Brian Doyle doesn t have any of those. His readers turn instantly and preternaturally uncommon, seeing and feeling and noticing and knowing what they have never before taken in: a kind of laughing piercing antic holiness. To read Brian Doyle is to apprehend, all at once, the force that drives Mark Twain, and Walt Whitman, and James Joyce, and Emily Dickinson, and Francis of Assisi, and Jonah under his gourd. Brian Doyle is an extraordinary writer whose tales will endure. The sublime Waking the Bishop is going to inhabit American anthologies forever and ever.
Cynthia Ozick

"

Brian Doyle has a fine quick mind alert for anomaly and quirk-none of them beyond his agile pen.
Peter Matthiessen

"

No one writes prose with the verve and honesty, the gusto and wit of Brian Doyle.
Pattiann Rogers

"

Some people can write. Some people can feel. Brian Doyle, born with a silver tongue and a big heart, is among the lucky few who can do both.
Anne Fadiman

"

What I like about Brian Doyle s writing is that it s real it s got mud and blood and tears but it s also got earthly angels who teach him to grasp on to each small epiphany as it opens before him.
Martin Flanagan

"

Brian Doyle s writing is driven by his passion for the human, touchable, daily life, and equally for the untouchable mystery of all else his gratitude, his sweet lyrical reaching, is a gift to us all.
Mary Oliver

"