Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History After Genocide and Mass Violence

Martha Minow (Author)
Available

Description

The rise of collective violence and genocide is the twentieth century's most terrible legacy. Martha Minow, a Harvard law professor and one of our most brilliant and humane legal minds, offers a landmark book on our attempts to heal after such large-scale tragedy. Writing with informed, searching prose of the extraordinary drama of the truth commissions in Argentina, East Germany, and most notably South Africa; war-crime prosecutions in Nuremberg and Bosnia; and reparations in America, Minow looks at the strategies and results of these riveting national experiments in justice and healing.

Product Details

Price
$26.40
Publisher
Beacon Press
Publish Date
November 01, 1999
Pages
224
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.9 X 8.5 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780807045077

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About the Author

Martha Minow is a professor of law at Harvard Law School. She is author of Making All the Difference: Inclusion, Exclusion and American Law and Not Only for Myself: Identity, Politics, and Law. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Reviews

Skillfully explores what steps can be taken in the wake of mass atrocities. . . . Incisive and insightful. --Jane Lampman, The Christian Science Monitor

"Compassionate and well-reasoned . . . Minow makes a convincing case for the restorative power of speaking about trauma." --Alexandra Starr, Washington Monthly

"A deeply humane and empathetic argument." --Alice Kessler-Harris, The Women's Review of Books

"Offers a remarkable analysis of a troublesome legacy." --Donald W. Shriver Jr., The Christian Century

"In taking a closer look at the social and historical roots of genocide and mass violence, Minow recognizes that justice is a process, not an end. Between Vengeance and Forgiveness is complicated, ambiguous, and deeply unsatisfying-exactly as it ought to be." --Nicholas Confessore, The American Prospect