Between Dog and Wolf

Sasha Sokolov (Author) Alexander Boguslawski (Translator)
Available

Description

Sasha Sokolov is one of few writers to have been praised by Vladimir Nabokov, who called his first novel, A School for Fools, "an enchanting, tragic, and touching book." Sokolov's second novel, Between Dog and Wolf, written in 1980, has long intimidated translators because of its complex puns, rhymes, and neologisms. Language rather than plot motivates the story--the novel is often compared to James Joyce's Finnegans Wake--and time, characters, and death all prove unstable. The one constant is the Russian landscape, where the Volga is a more-crossable River Styx, especially when it freezes in winter. Sokolov's fiction has hugely influenced contemporary Russian writers. Now, thanks to Alexander Boguslawski's bold and superb translation, English readers can access what many consider to be his best work.

Product Details

Price
$14.95  $13.75
Publisher
Columbia University Press
Publish Date
December 06, 2016
Pages
296
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.8 X 8.4 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780231181471
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Sasha Sokolov is the author of the novels A School for Fools (1976), Between Dog and Wolf (1980), and Astrophobia (1985) and the essay collection In the House of the Hanged (2011). Alexander Boguslawski is professor of Russian at Rollins College and the translator of Sasha Sokolov's A School for Fools (2015) and In the House of the Hanged (2011).

Reviews

A masterful feat. Boguslawski has created a discourse, or literary style, that captures Sokolov's at once folksy and fanciful, verbally playful, punning speech and is remarkably faithful to the subtleties of Sokolov's language.--Olga Matich, University of California, Berkeley
Sasha Sokolov's Between Dog and Wolf, delivered in Alexander Boguslawski's masterful translation, comprises a daring act of immersion into the depths of language that results in semantic spasms of the great Russian literary body. The highly experimental novel, which unquestionably belongs to the highest literary ranks, announces the twilight of the novelistic tradition, but already eagerly awaits its imminent dawn.--Nariman Skakov, Stanford University
Sokolov is one of those rare novelists whose primary concern is the praise and exploration of a language rather than the development of a position. In this, he is in the line of Gogol, Lermontov, Nabokov.--David Remnick, Washington Post
One of the great living Russian writers.--Flavorwire
Intricate and rewarding--a Russian Finnegans Wake.--Vanity Fair
One feels the caliber and creativity of the original. This is a riot of language, invaluable for scholars and fascinating to the curious.--Publishers Weekly